Reviews

Do We Need Midwives?

Despite the provocative title, this is a must read for professionals interested in exploring the consequences of accepted childbirth norms and their effects on future generations.

The author takes the reader on a journey, describing the changing cultural socialisation of childbirth.

He argues that we need a new awareness, linking knowledge from across different disciplines to truly understand the short and longer-term impact of how we are born.

The book questions the cultural belief that medical help for women in labour could interfere with the normal physiology of childbirth.

Drawing on epidemiological studies, the book also explores the long-term effects of substances such as synthetic oxytocin and why this matters.

The book is pleasingly concise, leaving the reader with much to ponder and can be recommended to paediatricians, nurses working with families, and health researchers.

The author takes the reader on a journey, describing the changing cultural socialisation of childbirth.

He argues that we need a new awareness, linking knowledge from across different disciplines to truly understand the short and longer-term impact of how we are born.

The book questions the cultural belief that medical help for women in labour could interfere with the normal physiology of childbirth.

Drawing on epidemiological studies, the book also explores the long-term effects of substances such as synthetic oxytocin and why this matters.

The book is pleasingly concise, leaving the reader with much to ponder and can be recommended to paediatricians, nurses working with families, and health researchers.

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