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What to say to help patients see incontinence need not be inevitable

Encouraging individuals to open up about continence can be life-changing for them
nurse comforts patient

Encouraging individuals to open up about continence can be life-changing for them

People of all ages can be affected by the involuntary loss of urine and/or faeces. An estimated 14 million men, women, young people and children are living with bladder problems in the UK, according to one study .

However, the prevalence of incontinence is harder to capture than it should be – in part, because of the embarrassment people feel about seeking help.

There is an expectation that childbirth or ageing may cause incontinence, and when a family member or friend has had this experience, an individual may believe it will inevitably happen to them too.

Getting to the cause

As healthcare professionals, we have an opportunity to break this cycle, sharing the knowledge

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