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Leave judgement at the door when talking about self-harm

Like many harmful coping strategies, self-harm provides short-term relief
Self-harm consultation

Like many harmful coping strategies, self-harm provides short-term relief

Self-harm is an emotive subject, and one that provokes strong responses from both those who engage in it and those who try to understand it.

Recent research showing a startling increase in self-harm, particularly among young women, has prompted considerable concern and debate.

Evokes a hostile response

The Lancet Psychiatry study looked at data from mental health surveys across England. Almost one in five 16-to-24-year-old women in 2014 reported having self-harmed at some point, compared with 11.7% in 2007 and 6.5% in 2014. Half of those who self-harmed received no support from medical or mental health services.

Typically, people who self-harm say they encounter hostility from those they approach for help. Perhaps this is understandable as a response to a behaviour that some find baffling and in stark contrast

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