News

Researchers to design nursing care system for COVID-19 patients

The University of Exeter will lead a nine-month study to build on innovations developed during the pandemic
Nurse in PPE. Picture: Shutterstock

The University of Exeter will lead a nine-month study to build on innovations developed during the pandemic

Nurses and scientists are leading a UK-wide study to evaluate nursing care for hospital patients with COVID-19.

The study, by the University of Exeter, will see the team research, design and evaluate a system of nursing care specifically for COVID-19 patients in a large clinical trial across the UK.

Mapping the innovations that have helped coronavirus patients

The government has awarded the researchers 430,000 to set up the COVID-NURSE trial and hopes the evidence will help nursing teams nationally and internationally to use innovative best practice.

View our COVID-19 resource centre

University of Exeter professor of health services and nurse David Richards said the research

The University of Exeter will lead a nine-month study to build on innovations developed during the pandemic

 Shutterstock
The project will identify and share best practice in nursing Picture: Shutterstock

Nurses and scientists are leading a UK-wide study to evaluate nursing care for hospital patients with COVID-19.

The study, by the University of Exeter, will see the team research, design and evaluate a system of nursing care specifically for COVID-19 patients in a large clinical trial across the UK.

Mapping the innovations that have helped coronavirus patients

The government has awarded the researchers £430,000 to set up the ‘COVID-NURSE’ trial and hopes the evidence will help nursing teams nationally and internationally to use innovative best practice.

View our COVID-19 resource centre

University of Exeter professor of health services and nurse David Richards said the research will include a national survey of nurses who have been caring for COVID-19 patients to assess how they have overcome barriers to providing care and any new practices or novel ways of working.

‘We know many nurses have risen to the complex challenges of caring for people with COVID-19 in innovative ways,’ he said.

‘This study will help us establish what has proved effective, so innovations that benefit patients can be rolled out.'

As the study progresses, researchers will work with patients, nurses and other healthcare workers to design specific nursing procedures for COVID-19 patients.

Wider use of the procedures developed

Professor Richards said the nine-month project is expected to have a first prototype for the procedures ready in September to start testing in October.

A ‘rapid-cycle’ trial will allow the team to test the procedures quickly across an initial 18 NHS sites to determine their effects on patient experience, care quality, patients’ ability to manage day-to-day activities, treatment outcomes and cost.

Professor Richards added that healthcare sectors outside of the NHS could also benefit from the study findings.

‘We will ensure they could be adapted for care homes, patients with other conditions requiring isolation and to global health systems,’ he said.


In other news

Register for free updates Register for free updates

We have made it easy for you to stay up to date with the latest developments in nursing, including relevant COVID-19 information.

Register with us for free – it takes less than a minute – and you'll receive news and updates straight to your inbox.

Register here today

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs