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Drug developed for women is found to be effective in men with prostate cancer

A pioneering drug developed to treat inherited cancers in women can also benefit men with advanced prostate cancer, according to a new study.

Picture credit: SPL

In a trial of precision medicine in prostate cancer, a team of international researchers, led by experts at Londons Institute of Cancer Research, studied 49 men with treatment-resistant advanced prostate cancer. All the men were treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib, the first drug to reach the market to target inherited cancer mutations.

More than one third of the men responded to the drug. It stopped prostate cancer growth, generating lasting falls in prostate-specific antigen levels, falls in circulating tumour cell counts in blood, and radiological responses on scans. Many of the men who benefited from the drug had not inherited cancer genes, but their tumours had acquired defects in DNA repair.

Lead study author Professor Johann de Bono, head of drug development at the Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said the trial marks a significant step forward in

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Picture credit: SPL

In a trial of ‘precision medicine’ in prostate cancer, a team of international researchers, led by experts at London’s Institute of Cancer Research, studied 49 men with treatment-resistant advanced prostate cancer. All the men were treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib, the first drug to reach the market to target inherited cancer mutations.

More than one third of the men responded to the drug. It stopped prostate cancer growth, generating lasting falls in prostate-specific antigen levels, falls in circulating tumour cell counts in blood, and radiological responses on scans. Many of the men who benefited from the drug had not inherited cancer genes, but their tumours had acquired defects in DNA repair.

Lead study author Professor Johann de Bono, head of drug development at the Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said the trial ‘marks a significant step forward in the treatment of prostate cancer’.

‘It proves the principle that we can detect prostate cancers with specific targetable mutations using genomic sequencing to deliver more precise cancer care by matching treatment to those men most likely to benefit,’ he said.

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