Analysis

A Good Samaritan nurse can be a lifesaver – literally, but before stepping in, make sure to weigh the risks

The legal and professional implications for nurses who go to the aid of people away from their workplace
The Ibrahim family (L-R) April, Isaac and Magdi Ibrahim, with baby Eliana. This article looksw at the legal and professional implications of nurses going to the aid of people in trouble outside their workplace.

The legal and professional implications for nurses who go to the aid of people away from their workplace

  • Nurses have a duty to help under the NMC code but there’s no legal obligation
  • Even so, you must act within the limits of your knowledge and competence only
  • Always take account of the safety of others – and never put yourself in danger

Delivering a baby in a hospital car park, tending to a man having a cardiac arrest at the roadside, the first-year nursing student saving a child’s life while on holiday – just some examples of off-duty nurses springing into action in emergency situations covered by Nursing Standard over the past year.

Here we look back at some of

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