Features

When retirement beckons, flexible working might tempt older nurses to stay

Flexible working, especially the option to do shorter hours, could help retain older nurses, many of whom want to continue but feel burnt out.
retire

Flexible working, especially the option to do shorter hours, could help retain older nurses, many of whom want to continue but feel burnt out

Three months after retiring at 55, renal nurse Julie Emerson found she missed working and took another post. But while keen to share the skills and experience built up over almost four decades, she has handed in her notice at her most recent job after struggling with 13-hour shifts.

It was when she made a mistake during a long, tiring shift that she realised she could not continue. Ms Emerson, 57, from Corby, Northamptonshire, says: ‘I have never made such an error in my life and I can only think it was because I was so tired – and that isn’t safe.

190,000

More than 190,000 nurses and midwives on the register are

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Nursing Standard
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs