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Hand hygiene needn’t mean sore skin

For many nurses the price of good hand hygiene is sore, broken skin. New guidance from the RCN shows how to combine best practice with skin care

For many nurses the price of good hand hygiene is sore, broken skin. New guidance from the RCN shows how to combine best practice with skin care

Hand hygiene requirements can put nurses in a constant cycle of hand washing, rubbing alcohol hand sanitiser into their skin and wearing gloves. While this regimen is a vital part of protecting the health of patients and staff, it can lead to sore, dry and cracked skin.

The difficulties caused can go beyond the discomfort and pain of dermatitis, and it can ultimately prevent a nurse from doing their job.

Helen O’Boyle, an intensive care nurse at a London

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