My job

60 seconds with specialist immunisation nurse Leony Davies

If you have a passion for a particular area, pursue it. You might be surprised by the opportunities available for nurses, says specialist immunisation nurse Leony Davies.
leony

If you have a passion for a particular area, pursue it. You might be surprised by the opportunities available for nurses, says specialist immunisation nurse Leony Davies

Leony Davies qualified as a registered general nurse from the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, in 1994. She subsequently qualified as a registered sick childrens nurse (RSCN) and specialist community public health nurse while working as a childrens nurse and school nurse. Since 2010, she has been employed by Public Health Wales as a specialist nurse in immunisation with the Vaccine Preventable Disease Programme, and is currently studying part-time for her masters degree in public health and health promotion at Swansea University.

What are your main work responsibilities?

Offering advice and support to healthcare professionals, health

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If you have a passion for a particular area, pursue it. You might be surprised by the opportunities available for nurses, says specialist immunisation nurse Leony Davies

leony
Leony Davies says the RSCN course opened her eyes
to the breadth of roles for children’s nurses.

Leony Davies qualified as a registered general nurse from the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, in 1994. She subsequently qualified as a registered sick children’s nurse (RSCN) and specialist community public health nurse while working as a children’s nurse and school nurse. Since 2010, she has been employed by Public Health Wales as a specialist nurse in immunisation with the Vaccine Preventable Disease Programme, and is currently studying part-time for her master’s degree in public health and health promotion at Swansea University.

What are your main work responsibilities?

Offering advice and support to healthcare professionals, health boards and the Welsh Government on vaccination programmes for the school-age population of Wales.

How did you get your job?

I worked as a school nurse with a lead role in immunisation and led on the local implementation of the human papillomavirus vaccination programme. When a national post within immunisation became available, it seemed a natural career progression.

Who are your clients/patients?

The whole population of Wales. Vaccination has the potential to protect everyone.

What do you love about your job?

Constantly thinking ‘outside the box’ to find new ways of engaging with young people.

What is your top priority at work?

Supporting health boards to improve and maintain vaccine uptake in the children and young people of Wales.

What has been your most formative career experience?

The RSCN course opened my eyes to the breadth of roles for children’s nurses, especially within public health, and probably guided my career choices.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you?

Not to view people in isolation. As a community nurse, visiting people in their own homes, you become more aware of the different dynamics around each child, family or community.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

If you have a passion for a particular area, pursue it – you might be surprised by the opportunities available to nurses in roles you never knew existed.

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