Expert advice

Workplace: How can I advise nurses who regularly have split days off?

Split days off are becoming a reality for many nurses but they can play havoc with your health and wellbeing, says Zeba Arif. 

Split days off are becoming a reality for many nurses but they can play havoc with your health and wellbeing, says Zeba Arif

Most nurses are contracted to work 37.5 hours over five days, followed by two days off.

But many areas of the NHS are so short staffed that split days off - where you don’t get two consecutive days off – are becoming a reality for many nurses as managers struggle to provide cover for shifts.

Days off are essential to maintaining a healthy work/life balance - particularly in increasingly pressured working environments – and this could be seen as a health and safety issue.

You may find it difficult to rest and recharge your batteries in just one day, or you may have caring, domestic or other responsibilities which require you to have two days off together.

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