Expert advice

Workforce: What do the 2016 NHS staff survey results really tell us?

Much is made about signs of stability and improvement, but the most important messages for policy makers can often be found in the less positive findings, says workforce expert James Buchan. 
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Much is made about signs of stability and improvement, but the most important messages for policy makers can often be found in the less positive findings, says workforce expert James Buchan

Every year, the NHS in England conducts what is almost certainly the biggest regular staff survey in health care, anywhere in the world.

The 2016 NHS staff survey involved 316 NHS organisations, with 982,000 NHS staff invited to participate. Returns from more than 423,000 staff equated to a response rate of 44%. The findings were published in early March, and as ever with such surveys, some messages instantly emerge.

Much is made about signs of stability or improvement in issues like staff

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