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Why taking a nap is a white-knuckle ride

Jane Bates takes a reckless rest in the silly season.
Jane Bates

Jane Bates takes a reckless rest in the silly season

I awoke from my afternoon slumber, stretched like a cat on a warm fuzzy pillow, slept some more, then opened my eyes and contemplated the sheer joy of an afternoon nap in summer, lulled to sleep by the sun and the sound of bees buzzing and doves cooing...

But as I shake off my drowsiness I start to ponder those periodic warnings that napping is bad for us. This years version declared that sleeping for 40 minutes in the day increases the risk of heart disease.

In the past naps have been linked to a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes. And yet in a way, the idea that we power-nappers are playing a dangerous game is quite thrilling. Without ever having been a risk taker, apparently I have been dicing with death. Perhaps snoozing should

...

Jane Bates takes a reckless rest in the silly season

I awoke from my afternoon slumber, stretched like a cat on a warm fuzzy pillow, slept some more, then opened my eyes and contemplated the sheer joy of an afternoon nap in summer, lulled to sleep by the sun and the sound of bees buzzing and doves cooing...

But as I shake off my drowsiness I start to ponder those periodic warnings that napping is bad for us. This year’s version declared that sleeping for 40 minutes in the day increases the risk of heart disease.

In the past naps have been linked to a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes. And yet in a way, the idea that we power-nappers are playing a dangerous game is quite thrilling. Without ever having been a risk taker, apparently I have been dicing with death. 
Perhaps snoozing should be deemed an extreme sport.

Then at last I will be able to join in with my adrenaline-junkie friends. When they come back from sky-diving into buckets or wrestling crocodiles, I will say: ‘When I was on leave I had a 10-minute siesta.’ ‘You weren’t afraid?’ they will ask, and I will laugh carelessly and tell them I once slept for a whole hour. 

Soon the boffins will refute this research and the power nap will again be deemed beneficial. Like chocolate, wine and coffee, daytime sleeps are in and out of favour almost on a cyclical basis.

Meanwhile I will enjoy my madcap, reckless persona. I might just need a little lie down while I think about it.


About the author

Jane Bates
Jane Bates is an ophthalmic nurse in Hampshire 

 

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