Comment

It is time to ban the fan

From infection control risk to undermining patient confidentiality, fans have no place in hospitals, says Jane Bates.
Jane Bates

From infection control risk to undermining patient confidentiality, fans have no place in hospitals, says Jane Bates

Uh-oh, here we go again, I think, when someone at work says they are too warm. On goes the fan and before you know it, your hitherto neat and under control coiffure is ruined and you end up resembling Ken Dodd.

If I had my way, I would get rid of these infernal machines. Sell them off and use the money to pay for research into hot flushes. Maybe retain a couple for patients with a fever, but otherwise cast them adrift.

The temperature in a hospital is never right for everyone. I am always too cold, but we are in uniform so I cannot put on an extra layer. Then there are the patients in a state of dishabille - the last thing they want is intermittent blasts

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From infection control risk to undermining patient confidentiality, fans have no place in hospitals, says Jane Bates 

‘Uh-oh, here we go again,’ I think, when someone at work says they are too warm. On goes the fan and before you know it, your hitherto neat and under control coiffure is ruined and you end up resembling Ken Dodd. 

If I had my way, I would get rid of these infernal machines. Sell them off and use the money to pay for research into hot flushes. Maybe retain a couple for patients with a fever, but otherwise cast them adrift. 

The temperature in a hospital is never right for everyone. I am always too cold, but we are in uniform so I cannot put on an extra layer. Then there are the patients in a state of dishabille - the last thing they want is intermittent blasts of cold air. 

If you sneakily try to turn them off, just as sneakily they get turned on again and you are working in something akin to a severe storm on the Beaufort Scale. Paperwork starts flying around, landing in patients’ soup or wrapped round the faces of hapless visitors. Some you may never find again. So much for patient confidentiality. 

And don’t get me started on infection control. With a whirring fan stirring up the air flow, someone just has to sneeze and those bugs are disseminated every which way and we all get a face full. 

Fans ruin our hairstyles, turn us into ice blocks, give the microbes a field day and make a laughing stock of data protection. They have no place in a hospital. It’s time to ban the fan. 


About the author 

Jane Bates is an ophthalmic nurse in Hampshire

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