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Videos of neonatal intensive care babies to reassure their parents

Parents are being kept updated about their baby’s progress in hospital through precious films made by staff.
Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow

Parents are being kept updated about their babys progress in hospital through precious films made by staff.

The personal videos are being made for the families of babies cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow.

This can help keep parents informed if they live a long way from the hospital, are caring for other children or have to return to work.

The films on video platform vCreate can be securely accessed by parents at any time on any device and only feature non-clinically sensitive updates.

Share videos

Neil Patel, consultant neonatologist, said the technology was introduced after families told us there is nothing more reassuring than actually seeing

Parents are being kept updated about their baby’s progress in hospital through precious films made by staff.


Staff at the neonatal intensive care unit at Glasgow’s Royal Hospital for Children are keeping parents up-to-date with their baby's progress via personal videos 

The personal videos are being made for the families of babies cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow.

This can help keep parents informed if they live a long way from the hospital, are caring for other children or have to return to work.

The films on video platform vCreate can be securely accessed by parents at any time on any device and only feature non-clinically sensitive updates.

Share videos

Neil Patel, consultant neonatologist, said the technology was introduced after families ‘told us there is nothing more reassuring than actually seeing their baby’.

Jack Weightman, whose six-week-old baby daughter, Sophie, was being cared for in the unit after she was born with a genetic condition, said that they could share the videos with their five-year-old son.

Mr Weightman said: ‘This not only keeps dads involved, but lets the whole family see.

‘It can be hard for the wider family not being able to attend the hospital, but they can watch and share the videos to feel involved.’


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