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New year’s honours 2022: nurses’ COVID-19 efforts recognised

National vaccine workforce lead and nursing lecturer who developed suicide prevention programme among those named, after a year of challenges and ‘unprecedented pressures’ in the profession
Some of the nurses named in the new year's honours list

National vaccine workforce lead and nursing lecturer who developed suicide prevention programme among those named, after a year of challenges and ‘unprecedented pressures’ in the profession

Nurses have been recognised in the new year’s honours list for their continued work and commitment during another year dominated by COVID-19.

Nurses working on respiratory wards, in community diabetes care, with children and young people and in leadership roles are among those receiving honours. Others have been recognised for their work in military nursing, travel medicine and suicide awareness.

Leadership, innovation and excellence amid pandemic pressures

Mark Radford led the NHS England vaccine workforce programme

The past year proved to be another difficult one for nursing, with the pressures of the pandemic, pay disputes, reports of burnout and ongoing staffing

National vaccine workforce lead and nursing lecturer who developed suicide prevention programme among those named, after a year of challenges and ‘unprecedented pressures’ in the profession

Nurses have been named in the new year's honours list 2022
Some of the nurses named in the new year's honours list 2022

Nurses have been recognised in the new year’s honours list for their continued work and commitment during another year dominated by COVID-19.

Nurses working on respiratory wards, in community diabetes care, with children and young people and in leadership roles are among those receiving honours. Others have been recognised for their work in military nursing, travel medicine and suicide awareness.

Leadership, innovation and excellence amid pandemic pressures

Mark Radford, who received a CBE
Mark Radford led the NHS England
vaccine workforce programme

The past year proved to be another difficult one for nursing, with the pressures of the pandemic, pay disputes, reports of burnout and ongoing staffing issues. But despite the challenges, nursing staff demonstrated leadership, innovation and excellence in clinical care, as recognised in the awards.

Health Education England chief nurse and NHS England deputy chief nursing officer Mark Radford receives a CBE for services to nursing.

Professor Radford, who led the national NHS vaccine workforce and training programme, said his CBE was recognition for the colleagues who had ‘helped shaped the nurse I am today’. ‘I have loved being a nurse for nearly 30 years – as a clinician, academic and leader, it has been the most rewarding career,’ he said.

‘This pandemic will shape our society forever, and many will look back on this time and ask "what did we do in the pandemic?" I, like many others, will be proud to say that we were nurses and health workers in the NHS and social care.’

Steve Hams, who received an MBE
Steve Hams, Gloucestershire Hospitals
NHS Foundation Trust chief nurse

Achievement ‘a reflection of my remarkable nurse colleagues’

Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust chief nurse Steve Hams receives an MBE for services to nursing.

Professor Hams was senior responsible officer for his trust’s COVID-19 vaccination programme when it began in December 2020. He also introduced the internationally acclaimed nursing and midwifery excellence programme at his trust, which promotes innovation and collaborative leadership.

‘I regard everything that I have achieved in my career as a reflection of the remarkable nurses and other colleagues that I have worked alongside,’ he said. ‘In healthcare, teamwork is everything.

‘The pandemic has highlighted the valuable contribution nurses bring to expertly caring for our patients, and I couldn’t be prouder of our nurses and the wider team.’

Support and guidance throughout nursing career

Clare Dickens, who received an MBE
Clare Dickens, who developed a
suicide awareness programme

University of Wolverhampton senior nursing lecturer Clare Dickens receives an MBE for improving suicide awareness.

Ms Dickens led the development of the award-winning Three Minutes to Save a Life programme, which aims to give people the confidence and understanding to tackle issues related to suicide and self-harm.

‘I am incredibly humbled to receive this honour, and this is one of the many signposts in my nursing and academic career where I have reflected on who has shaped my life, offering their support and guidance, and who has lifted me as they climb,’ she said.

‘It is impossible to name them all, but I reflect mainly on my children, my husband and family at this time. None of what I have pursued or achieved would have happened without them, we are a great team. So, this honour is for them too.’

Team effort, especially during the pandemic

Aneurin Bevan University Health Board deputy director of nursing Linda Alexander receives a BEM for her services to patient care and alternative workforce solutions in NHS Wales.

During the pandemic Ms Alexander led on workforce solutions projects to help boost nursing numbers, including loooking at different roles and responsibilities on wards. Her work led to a significant drop in nurse vacancies at the health board.

‘I feel hugely honoured and privileged to receive something like this,’ she told Nursing Standard. ‘I accept it on behalf of the health board and my amazing nursing colleagues, from the most junior to the most senior, who have helped me achieve what I have, particularly in the past two years.’

‘Standing tall’ despite unprecedented pressures

RCN president Denise Chaffer said the honours highlight the contribution of healthcare staff in what continues to be an ‘extremely challenging’ period for the nursing profession.

‘In the face on unprecedented pressures you have all stood tall and should be enormously proud of everything you have done,’ Dr Chaffer added.

The nurses named in the 2022 new year’s honours list

Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)

Mark Radford Health Education England chief nurse and NHS England deputy chief nursing officer. For services to nursing.

Jane Chiodini, who received an MBE
Jane Chiodini

Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)

Elizabeth Buchanan respiratory ward manager, Altnagelvin Area Hospital, Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland. For services to nursing in Northern Ireland, particularly during COVID-19.

Jane Chiodini travel health specialist nurse. For services to training and development in travel medicine.

Euan Hails, who received an MBE
Euan Hails

Clare Dickens senior lecturer, nursing studies, mental health, University of Wolverhampton. For services to education and improving suicide awareness.

Kenny Gibson NHS England national head of safeguarding. For services to leadership in healthcare.

Marie Marshall, who received an MBE
Marie Marshall

Euan Hails specialist child and adolescent mental health service consultant nurse, Aneurin Bevan University Health Board. For services to children and young people's mental health in Wales.

Steve Hams Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust chief nurse. For services to nursing.

Angel McIntyre, who received an MBE
Angela McIntyre

Marie Marshall nurse consultant for transition, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust. For services to children and young people’s health.

Angela McIntyre for services to the Foyle Hospice and the community in County Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

Patrick Nyarumbu, who received an MBE
Patrick Nyarumbu

Patrick Nyarumbu Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust executive director of strategy, people and partnerships. For services to nursing.

Medallist of the Order of the British Empire (BEM)

Linda Alexander deputy director of nursing, Aneurin Bevan University Health Board. For services to patient care and alternative workforce solutions in NHS Wales.


Karen Bussooa

Karen Bussooa former end of life care facilitator, University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust. For services to end of life care.

Ceri Jones, who received an MBE
Ceri Jones

Ceri Jones Cwm Taf Morgannwg University Health Board lead community diabetes specialist nurse. For services to diabetes care.

Ethel Liggett for services to the community in County Tyrone and to nursing in Northern Ireland.

Marjory Mulligan for services to nursing and to charity in Dungannon and South Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

Royal Red Cross

Royal Navy

CPO Kelly Brechany

CPO Carrie Stuart

Army

Maj Tracey Buckingham

SSgt Julie-Anne Fulford

Maj Debra Harvey

Lt Col Margaret-Ann Hodge

Royal Air Force

Gp Capt Fionnuala Bradley

Flt Sgt Holly Chambers

Sqn Ldr Sherry McBain

Sqn Ldr Elizabeth Paxman

Sgt Victoria Lee Van Der Wel

Sqn Ldr Christopher Wells

 


In other news

Government urged to prioritise COVID-19 tests for nurses

Nurse leaders raise concerns over safe staffing of Nightingale hubs

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