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The Queen’s Nurse returns to Scotland

Community nurses in Scotland now have the opportunity to go on a nine-month development programme to earn the right to be called a Queen’s Nurse. These expert community practitioners will be catalysts for change, says Clare Cable, chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute Scotland.
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Community nurses in Scotland now have the opportunity to go on a nine-month development programme to earn the right to be called a Queen’s Nurse. These expert community practitioners will be catalysts for change, says Clare Cable, chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute Scotland.

The Queen’s Nursing Institute was established in 1887 – Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee – to train nurses to provide home nursing for the ‘sick poor’. Queen’s Nurses were trained until 1969, when a National Certificate for District Nurses replaced their training.

The prestigious title Queen’s Nurse was reintroduced by the institute in 2007 to promote the highest standards of patient care in the community. There are now more than 1,100 Queen’s Nurses in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Reintroducing the role

Queen’s Nursing Institute Scotland (QNIS), a

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