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From Hollywood to the health service: sexual harassment at work

Nurses expect health organisations to take sexual harassment of staff seriously – even when the abuser is a vulnerable patient.
Sexual harrassment

Nurses expect health organisations to take sexual harassment of staff seriously – even when the abuser is a vulnerable patient

The Harvey Weinstein case has lifted the lid on sexual harassment, prompting shocking revelations and allegations of abuse and soul searching in industries stretching from Hollywood to Westminster.

After the claims against Weinstein there is an acceptance, as arguably there was not before, that many people in their working lives are subjected to inappropriate and even criminal behaviours, from unwanted sexual remarks to rape. But how prevalent is this kind of behaviour in healthcare?

‘One of the difficulties is that I don’t think we can say how much of a problem it is, with any certainty,’ says Nicola Lee, national officer in the RCN’s employment relations department.

While the annual NHS staff survey, the largest of its kind in

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