Career advice

How to leave your job

Knowing when – and how – to move on is an important career skill.
Nurse saying goodbye

Knowing when to move on, and how to go about it, is an important career skill

Picture: iStock

Leaving a job is never a decision you should take lightly, says Nick Simpson, CEO of health recruitment agency MSI Group.

Every nursing professional has things about their job they find frustrating and daily tasks they may not necessarily enjoy doing, but its important you take the time to consider the positive aspects of your current role before you make a decision.

Remain positive

If you do decide its time to go, maintain that positive attitude when handing in your notice. University of Derby discipline lead for healthcare practice Michelle Brown says: Acknowledge the value that your employment and experience have had for your professional and personal development. It is rare not to have got anything out of an employment opportunity.

Ms Brown emphasises the

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Knowing when to move on, and how to go about it, is an important career skill

Leaving job
Picture: iStock

‘Leaving a job is never a decision you should take lightly,’ says Nick Simpson, CEO of health recruitment agency MSI Group.

‘Every nursing professional has things about their job they find frustrating and daily tasks they may not necessarily enjoy doing, but it’s important you take the time to consider the positive aspects of your current role before you make a decision.’

Remain positive

If you do decide it’s time to go, maintain that positive attitude when handing in your notice. University of Derby discipline lead for healthcare practice Michelle Brown says: ‘Acknowledge the value that your employment and experience have had for your professional and personal development. It is rare not to have got anything out of an employment opportunity.’

Ms Brown emphasises the importance of telling your current employer that you would like to keep in touch, because this can be useful if you find yourself in a worse position or out of a job.

‘It is likely you will need a reference from your line manager, therefore being open and professional can also help them outline your strengths,’ she adds.

Be honest

Don’t be coy about your reasons for leaving, advises Mr Simpson. ‘If you are leaving because you have found a job that offers better career progression, or is better suited to your personal circumstances, then tell your manager.

‘Regardless of whether you get along well with them, or they are the reason you are leaving, stay professional and refrain from making the conversation overly emotional.’

What you should always do though is maintain your usual work ethic and high standards during your notice period. Again, this will help you to receive the positive reference you deserve.

‘Few healthcare professionals can risk isolating themselves from their contacts,’ says Hays Healthcare director Simon Hudson. ‘Be professional until your last shift because, you never know, the grass might not be greener and you may want to return.’

 

Simon Hudson’s tips for what to do when handing in your notice:

  1. Prioritise telling your line manager – don’t let them hear on the grapevine that you are planning to leave. It will create bad feeling, which isn’t what you need if you want a positive job reference.
  2. Put it in writing – nearly all organisations still request a formal resignation letter, so have this drafted with a clear outline of your desired leaving date and reason for leaving, and remember to keep it factual.

Dean Gurden is a freelance health writer

 

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