Evidence and Practice

Clinical

Evaluating a nurse-led sleep support intervention to reduce melatonin prescribing in children and young people

Evaluating a nurse-led sleep support intervention to reduce melatonin prescribing in...

Why you should read this article • To recognise the effects of sleep deprivation on parents, children and young people • To understand the research on melatonin use in children and young people who experience sleep disturbances • To identify non-pharmacological sleep support interventions that can be implemented for those experiencing sleep deprivation Background Sleep disturbance, often arising from the way parents manage their child’s sleep, affects 40% of children and leads to increased demand on clinical services. Children and young people with significant sleep issues can be treated effectively with a supportive approach but are often prescribed the hormone melatonin because of a lack of available support services. Aim To understand the effect and clinical implications of a nurse-led sleep support clinic on melatonin prescribing in children and young people. Method A retrospective case note evaluation was undertaken of a nurse-led sleep support service delivering a bespoke programme and follow-up support to a patient group of 124 children and young people, 104 of whom had co-morbidities. Results A total of 78 (63%) patients were successfully discharged without melatonin prescriptions after a median of two face-to-face clinic visits and three telephone calls. Eleven out of 12 patients had not restarted melatonin after 12 months. Conclusion A nurse-led, non-pharmacological approach to sleep support in children and young people can provide an effective, sustainable alternative to melatonin prescribing. The authors recommend that appropriate sleep support should be administered and the response reviewed before melatonin is prescribed. Investment in sleep services to support this approach is important.

Role of school nurses in identifying and supporting children and young people with mental health issues

Role of school nurses in identifying and supporting children and young people with...

Why you should read this article • To recognise role of school nurses in mental health provision for children and young people • To identify the importance of initiating early mental health interventions in schools • To understand the importance of further education in mental health for school nurses School nurses have an important role in the provision of mental health services because of their expertise in healthcare and education. The aim of this literature review was to explore research about school nurses’ ability to identify and support children and young people in secondary education with mental health issues. A search of healthcare-related databases was undertaken using search terms such as ‘specialist community public health nurse’ (SCPHN), ‘school nurses’, ‘young people’, mental health’ and ‘adolescent mental health’ to identify relevant research. The literature review found that school nurses perform various activities for children and young people, for example promoting optimal mental health, identifying concerns and initiating early interventions. However, the literature review also suggests that unless school nurses receive further education in mental health they will be unable to develop the necessary skills required to improve outcomes for children and young people in secondary education.

Non-biological lesbian mothers’ experiences of accessing healthcare for their children

Non-biological lesbian mothers’ experiences of accessing healthcare for their children

This group often experiences positive and negative interactions with healthcare professionals

Medication checks

A process for supporting children’s nurses after medication errors

Report on a quality improvement project aimed at improving the process of supporting nurses

Exploring support systems for nurses involved with safeguarding children

Exploring support systems for nurses involved with safeguarding children

Study found that safeguarding children work can have significant emotional effects on nurses

Parents’ perceptions of the transition of their child who is ventilator dependent from hospital to home

Perceptions of transition from hospital to home of a child who is ventilator dependent

Families can provide skilled, competent care at home to their children with support

CPD articles

Biological basis of child health 1: understanding the cell and genetics

Biological basis of child health 1: understanding the cell and genetics

An introduction to cell biology and genetics for children’s nurses

Care and management of children with a totally implanted central venous access device: portacath

Care and management of children with a totally implanted central venous access device:...

Research and advances in technology have enabled children and young people with life-limiting conditions to live longer. To maintain their well-being and quality of life many of these children usually require some form of intravenous access for treatment. Children’s nurses should have the skills and training to ensure they are competent to practise using totally implanted central venous access devices such as portacaths (ports). This article addresses the care and management of these ports in children and the wide variation in practice that exists in the UK, and makes recommendations for practice.

The Me first communication model

The Me first communication model

This article explores communication and decision-making with children and young people in healthcare. Children and young people report that healthcare professionals are good at explaining and helping them to understand what will happen to them, but that they do not feel involved in decision-making about their care or treatment. To improve communication with children and young people, they need to be involved in decision-making about their care and treatment. In partnership with children, young people and healthcare professionals Common Room Consulting, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust and Health Education England have co-produced a communication model, Me first, to support decision-making with children and young people in healthcare. This article introduces the Me first model and explores how it can be applied in clinical practice.

Migraine

Diagnosing and managing migraine in children and young people

This article gives an overview of migraine in children. It outlines the epidemiology of the condition and describes presentation with headache and other symptoms and linked conditions. It aims to raise awareness of the diagnosis of migraine and its impact on children and young people, their families and school life. The author also describes methods of diagnosis and management, and the importance of recognising and of avoiding medication overuse.

Complementary feeding

An update on complementary feeding

Complementary feeding is an important developmental milestone in children and occurs at a formative time for the development of healthy eating habits that can continue into later childhood and beyond. The timing of weaning has been a controversial subject and recommendations in the UK differ from those in Europe. In the UK and New Zealand, baby-led weaning is becoming increasingly popular. The importance of responsive feeding is highlighted to make parents aware of a baby’s cues indicating hunger or fullness. There have also been advances in the science of immunology that deem the early introduction of allergens to be a preventive strategy for food allergies. This article discusses the nutritional requirements for infants and reviews the foods that should be introduced and avoided. Guidelines are changing all the time, so nurses must keep up to date with current research to be able to offer advice to parents of infants.

Assessment and treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children and young people

Assessment and treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children and young people

Nocturnal enuresis – or bed-wetting – is one of the most common chronic conditions of childhood. It has a significant effect on the quality of life of affected children and their families and is associated with several comorbidities, some of which resolve on successful treatment. The causes of this troublesome condition are explored and the principles of assessment and treatment are discussed with reference to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance as well as research. Response to treatment resistance is considered and appropriate onward referral discussed.

A to Z of syndromes

Mother and baby

A-Z syndromes: Congenital Zika syndrome

First identified in 2015, there is no vaccine for this virus

Webbed_fingers

A-Z syndromes: Yunis-Varon syndrome

An insight into this rare genetic disorder in which both parents are recessive gene carriers

A-Z of syndromes: X-linked ichthyosis

An insight into this genetic disorder occurring in 1 in 6,000 infant males

Stef Sanjati

A-Z of syndromes: Waardenburg syndrome

Waardenburg syndrome is a genetic disorder that gives people a distinctive appearance

A-Z of syndromes: Usher syndrome

Understanding Usher syndrome which is found in approximately 10,000 people in the UK

Tay-sachs disease

A-Z Syndromes: Tay-Sachs disease

An insight into this genetic disorder which carries a poor prognosis and is often fatal

Jobs