Clinical

Our clinical nursing articles aim to inform and educate nurse practitioners and students. This is achieved through the publication of peer-reviewed, evidence-based, relevant and topical articles.

Implementing music therapy in a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit

Implementing music therapy in a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit

Music therapy can reinforce family-centred care and promote parent-infant bonding

Using arts-based digital storytelling in neonatal care to enhance nursing students’ empathy

Using arts-based digital storytelling in neonatal care to enhance students’ empathy

Stories based on parents’ narratives can help nursing students learn about experiences

LGBT parents

Experiences of LGBT parents when accessing healthcare for their children: a literature...

Why you should read this article: • To improve your knowledge of the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) parents when accessing healthcare for their children • To familiarise yourself with the concept of heteronormativity • To understand how staff awareness and training can improve the healthcare experiences of LGBT parents There are increasing numbers of parents who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), but there is little research on the experiences of LGBT parents when accessing healthcare for their children. The aims of this literature review were to identify existing articles on the topic, explore LGBT parents’ experiences and draw implications for practice. The review included ten studies published from 1995 onwards and conducted in Australia, Sweden, the US and Finland. Many LGBT parents had positive experiences while others had encountered overt homophobia. However, there remained an underlying sense of heteronormativity, with many healthcare professionals making heterosexist assumptions and healthcare forms being heterocentric. The documentation used in healthcare settings should be adapted and healthcare professionals should improve their awareness on this issue and have training on how to recognise and include LGBT families. The review did not identify any studies on this subject from the UK, which suggests that research on the healthcare experiences of families with LGBT parents in the UK is required.

Addressing the psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation

Psychosocial needs of people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation

Role of children’s nurses in addressing psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia

Anorexia: a literature review of young people’s experiences of hospital treatment

Anorexia: a literature review of young people’s experiences of hospital treatment

Why you should read this article: • To enhance your understanding of the experiences of young people with anorexia who receive hospital treatment • To recognise the importance of addressing the emotional needs of young people with anorexia in addition to their physical needs • To identify how you can improve your practice when caring for young people with anorexia Anorexia nervosa is characterised by significantly low body weight, a fear of weight gain and persistent efforts to prevent the restoration of normal weight. It has potentially life-threatening physical and psychological complications, and many young people with anorexia present to hospital in a seriously compromised physical condition. While their physical symptoms require urgent treatment, addressing their emotional and psychological needs is equally important if they are to progress towards recovery. However, the conflicting thoughts common in anorexia mean that young people often feel highly ambivalent about treatment, which makes the disorder particularly challenging to treat. This article details a literature review undertaken to explore the perceptions and experiences of young people who have received hospital treatment for anorexia, with the aim of offering children’s nurses insights into how they can optimally support these patients. The findings demonstrate the importance of listening to young people, treating them as individuals and understanding their experiences, in addition to addressing their physical health needs.

Children’s and adolescents’ experiences of living with cancer

Children’s and adolescents’ experiences of living with cancer

Why you should read this article: • To recognise the need to include the perspectives of children and adolescents with cancer in research and practice • To identify the value of seeking children’s and adolescents’ perspectives in developing child-centred interventions • To gain a greater understanding of the experiences of children and adolescents following a diagnosis of cancer Background All healthcare professionals working with children should have a child-centred perspective, and should be responsive to children and adolescents who want to talk about their thoughts and feelings. The child’s or adolescent’s story is the starting point for mutual understanding between them and the healthcare professional, and is the basis for shared decision-making between patients and healthcare professionals in child-centred care. Aim To advance understanding of how Swedish children and adolescents with cancer perceived the effects of the disease and its treatment on their everyday life. Method Ten girls and five boys, aged between five and 18 years, with cancer were interviewed individually using four communication tools. The interviews lasted between 20 and 65 minutes and took place without their parents present. The data were analysed using content analysis. Findings Transition to an unpredictable everyday life was identified as a main theme, with five subthemes: struggling with side effects of the cancer and its treatment; treatment as an ‘emotional rollercoaster’; changed self and being vulnerable; changed social life; and concerns about academic achievement. Conclusion To provide effective support and care for children and adolescents with cancer, healthcare professionals should strive to listen to them and focus on their perspectives.

Improving how positive newborn screening results are communicated to parents of children with sickle cell disease

Communicating positive screening results to parents of children with sickle cell disease

Healthcare professionals should be confident and knowledgeable about the disorder

National Children’s Hospitals Bereavement Network standards for supporting families following the death of a child

Bereavement support standards for families following the death of a child

Introduction to the National Children’s Hospitals Bereavement Network’s support standards

Planning surgery for young people with learning disabilities

Planning surgery for young people with learning disabilities

Why you should read this article: • To be aware of the challenges of hospital admission for a young person with learning disabilities • To recognise the importance of comprehensive multidisciplinary planning, communication and teamwork to ensure a successful outcome • To identify the need for input from dedicated learning disability liaison nurses in acute children’s services Surgery for spinal deformity is complex and preparation involves a wide multidisciplinary team. For young people with learning disabilities, especially those who have behaviour that challenges, there are further considerations to ensure that their hospital stay is a positive experience and all their additional needs are met. Staff and carers need to be well informed and there must be effective communication. Evaluation of one patient’s journey through pre-assessment, surgery and rehabilitation has identified the need for more input from learning disability liaison nurses in acute children’s services.

Improving practice in accessing haemodialysis central venous catheters

Improving practice in accessing haemodialysis central venous catheters

Why you should read this article: • To enhance your awareness of the variation in practice between children’s haemodialysis units in relation to accessing haemodialysis central venous catheters (CVCs) • To learn about the changes to practice in haemodialysis CVC access and blood sampling technique made by one unit to improve patient safety • To recognise how reviewing one area of practice may lead to changes in other areas In children, haemodialysis is used as a form of renal replacement therapy and is typically delivered via a central venous catheter (CVC). It is necessary to access the CVC for dialysis and blood sampling regularly, and safe line practice is essential to minimise complications associated with CVCs, including infection. The authors had concerns about the rate of CVC infection in their children’s haemodialysis unit, which prompted a practice review. A questionnaire was emailed to all other children’s haemodialysis units in the UK, which identified variations in practice and training. The authors subsequently modified their unit’s CVC access guidelines and blood sampling technique, and developed a new competency-based ‘haemodialysis CVC access only’ training programme for nursing staff. A willingness to review practice in the unit, supported by comparison and communication with other units, assisted in implementing this change in practice.

Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS): providing resuscitative care

Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (...

Resuscitative care for a child with suspected PIMS-TS associated with SARS-CoV-2

Maternal experiences of domestic abuse and their effect on the mother’s approach to parenting

Maternal experiences of domestic abuse and effects on the mother’s approach to parenting

Maternal experiences of domestic abuse can have detrimental effects on mothers’ parenting

Use of subcutaneous fluids in palliative care with children: a case study

A discussion of subcutaneous fluid therapy in the children’s palliative care setting

Designing an adolescent safeguarding curriculum framework for preregistration nurse...

A proposed curriculum framework for adolescent safeguarding education

Factors contributing to parental ‘vaccine hesitancy’ for childhood immunisations

A literature review of factors contributing to ‘vaccine hesitancy’ among parents

Evaluating a nurse-led sleep support intervention to reduce melatonin prescribing in...

Recommendations for a nurse-led, non-pharmacological approach to sleep support in children

Role of school nurses in identifying and supporting children and young people with...

A literature review on school nurses’ ability to identify mental health issues in children

Non-biological lesbian mothers’ experiences of accessing healthcare for their children

This group often experiences positive and negative interactions with healthcare professionals

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