Revalidation

Practice-related feedback: surprise award taught me about showing appreciation

A glowing nomination for an award gave Jaime Hyde-Wyatt new confidence in her practice as a critical care outreach sister, and reminded her of the importance of showing appreciation to others

A glowing nomination for an award gave Jaime Hyde-Wyatt new confidence in her practice as a critical care outreach sister, and reminded her of the importance of showing appreciation to others

As a critical care outreach clinical nurse specialist, I dip in and out of peoples lives, usually during highly stressful events. These critical moments when patients are seriously ill and sometimes deteriorating are difficult for patients, their families and the staff involved.

It is a privilege to be able to help during these times but the work carried out by the team often goes unnoticed, or so it seems. So it was a surprise, and a huge honour, for me to be nominated for a local award at Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS

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A glowing nomination for an award gave Jaime Hyde-Wyatt new confidence in her practice as a critical care outreach sister, and reminded her of the importance of showing appreciation to others

Jaime_Hyde-Wyatt
Clinical nurse specialist Jaime Hyde-Wyatt was touched by her award,
and resolved to let others know their work is appreciated. 

As a critical care outreach clinical nurse specialist, I dip in and out of people’s lives, usually during highly stressful events. These critical moments when patients are seriously ill and sometimes deteriorating are difficult for patients, their families and the staff involved.

It is a privilege to be able to help during these times but the work carried out by the team often goes unnoticed, or so it seems. So it was a surprise, and a huge honour, for me to be nominated for a local award at Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust last year.

The nomination for the award said: ‘Jaime works exceptionally hard. She has a vast knowledge base and excellent skills of assessment and care planning. She is a confident, calm and methodical autonomous worker who at all times demonstrates professionalism, promotes evidence-based care and considers the patient before anything else.’

My work was noticed

It highlighted that I worked well in all settings, trained and supported staff and took time to be kind and clear with patients. The nomination’s description of me as a patient advocate and excellent example to staff meant that these important aspects of my work were noticed.

The feedback made me realise that although it might seem that we are working under the radar, our colleagues do notice the impact that we have in the care of critically ill patients. I was deeply touched by this nomination as it describes the service that I strive to deliver, and it was hugely gratifying to know that I was achieving this.

Appreciating others

The value of giving feedback to our colleagues cannot be overemphasised. I altered my practice following the nomination by not only thanking staff when I had worked with them in caring for a patient but also by giving them some specific positive feedback.

Too often we think that our hard work goes unnoticed, but this experience made me realise that people do notice what we do and how we behave. Since this nomination I have also nominated others for hospital awards in order to show my colleagues that their actions are being recognised and appreciated.

 

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