Patient view

Hospice nurse’s professionalism shone through when her husband became a patient

Anne Sutton was already respected greatly as manager of a specialist palliative care ward, and her standing was enhanced further when her husband became a patient, as described here by her daughter Julie.

Anne Sutton was already respected greatly as manager of a specialist palliative care ward, and her standing was enhanced further when her husband became a patient, as described here by her daughter Julie

Anne_Sutton
Anne Sutton

The word that always crops up when my mother, Anne Sutton, is discussed by our family members, her patients or her fellow members of staff is ‘angel’.

She is the most caring nurse I have met and it is a wonderful to see someone with such dedication to her patients, profession and team. Her professionalism was at its finest when her husband, my dad, became a patient at the hospice where she works.

My mum has been the manager of St Joseph’s Ward, a specialist palliative care ward at St Margaret of Scotland Hospice in Clydebank, for about two years. My involvement with the hospice as a fundraiser has allowed me to see firsthand what my mum is capable of and the respect that others have for her.

Staff development

She has put processes in place to support staff and help them with their personal development. For example, she recognises when staff should be encouraged to take on a mentorship role, and always tries to ensure that staff nurses are learning and growing as much as possible.

She also introduced a ward-specific nursing student handbook to help students feel at ease with their first block of off-duty, completed for them, and details including staff names and positions and information about their mentor. This helps students to settle and encourages them to do their best, as they feel comfortable and part of the team.

To implement it she has worked tirelessly in her own time, in addition to doing 14 and 16-hour days, to make sure her staff feel happy and supported.

Unwavering dedication

She makes sure that everything is patient focused and always does her best for patients and their families. I learned this when my dad was a patient at the hospice. I was so proud of how my mum handled this situation. Although she was not directly involved in much of his care I experienced her professional side firsthand in the way she cared for me as a patient’s relative.

She would take the time I needed if I had questions about my dad’s cancer, diagnosis and prognosis. Nothing was ever a bother, nothing ever took too much time.

My mother has been an integral part of her team, which has been rated ‘excellent’ in its three most recent inspections by the Healthcare Environment Inspectorate.

In terms of unwavering dedication and family care, my mother is second to none.

 

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