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Crystal Oldman: it is the sense of belonging that brings Queen’s Nurses together

The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI) will celebrate its 130th anniversary on 20 June. Chief executive Crystal Oldman reflects on the heritage of the QNI and the evolution of community nursing. 
Queens nurses_tile_iStock.jpg

The Queens Nursing Institute (QNI) will celebrate its 130th anniversary on 20 June. Chief executive Crystal Oldman reflects on the heritage of the QNI and the evolution of community nursing

In 1893, Florence Nightingale said hospitals are only an intermediate stage of civilization, never intended at all even to take in the whole sick population.

Her vision of caring for people in their own homes is part of the heritage of the Queens Nursing Institute (QNI), and as we prepare to celebrate our 130th anniversary, we are delighted to be the nursing charity with the longest history of supporting excellence in nursing across the UK.

Another of the UKs most iconic nurses is Mary Seacole. Her champion, the legendary Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, recently gave an inspirational,

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The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI) will celebrate its 130th anniversary on 20 June. Chief executive Crystal Oldman reflects on the heritage of the QNI and the evolution of community nursing 


It is remembering the organisation's past and celebrating its future that
unites the QN family. Picture: iStock

In 1893, Florence Nightingale said hospitals are ‘only an intermediate stage of civilization, never intended at all even to take in the whole sick population.’ 

Her vision of caring for people in their own homes is part of the heritage of the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI), and as we prepare to celebrate our 130th anniversary, we are delighted to be the nursing charity with the longest history of supporting excellence in nursing across the UK.

Another of the UK’s most iconic nurses is Mary Seacole. Her champion, the legendary Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, recently gave an inspirational, moving and humbling speech to 250 of our Queen’s Nurses (QNs). In her speech, Dame Elizabeth confirmed a commitment to community nursing, and a determination that the black heroes of nursing have a rightful and equal place in our heritage, alongside their white sisters. 

Creating history 

It is imperative that we maintain significant links to our past, and cherish our profession’s history. The golden thread of our heritage is remembering those who have gone before us and celebrating those who continue to make a difference every day.

It is this sense of belonging to a family that brings QN's together. I witnessed this recently in Cornwall, where more than 150 nurses from a widespread and geographically challenging area were brought together by a QN to discuss and plan the future of our profession.

I left there feeling energised and inspired, confident that the QN family is growing and developing, meeting the changing needs of communities in new contexts of care, and creating history every day. 

To learn more about the QNI go to www.qni.org.uk


About the author 

 

 

 

Crystal Oldman is chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute 

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