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Crystal Oldman: International collaboration will help us improve community services in the UK

 Learning from colleagues around the world enables us to share innovative ideas and research to support best practice, says QNI chief executive Crystal Oldman. 
international colleagues

Learning from colleagues around the world enables us to share innovative ideas and research to support best practice, says QNI chief executive Crystal Oldman

I was recently invited to Japan to learn more about how nursing care is delivered in the home, and to compare and contrast services in Japan with services in the UK.

Japan has three times as many hospital beds per head of population than the UK, but there is still a pressing need to deliver more care in the home.

Shadowing a nurse in the district nursing service in Yokohama, I witnessed excellent care and relationships with patients, families and carers, and truly integrated health and social care services.

Market approach

The difference between healthcare in Japan and the UK is the formers market

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 Learning from colleagues around the world enables us to share innovative ideas and research to support best practice, says QNI chief executive Crystal Oldman


International collaboration is vital for nurses, Crystal Oldman says. Picture: iStock

I was recently invited to Japan to learn more about how nursing care is delivered in the home, and to compare and contrast services in Japan with services in the UK.

Japan has three times as many hospital beds per head of population than the UK, but there is still a pressing need to deliver more care in the home. 

Shadowing a nurse in the district nursing service in Yokohama, I witnessed excellent care and relationships with patients, families and carers, and truly integrated health and social care services. 

Market approach 

The difference between healthcare in Japan and the UK is the former‘s ‘market approach’. A mixture of private and national insurance payments can mean different private providers deliver district nursing services in any one locality. 

Sharing challenges and solutions with the Japanese nurses was refreshing and energising. I was impressed by the services provided by nurses, allied health practitioners and social services, and my Japanese colleagues were keen to learn more about UK nurses’ ability to prescribe. 

International collaboration is vital for nurses. We can learn so much from colleagues in other countries, and share innovative ideas and research to support best practice. One way of participating in the work around community health nursing research is the International Collaboration for Community Health Research. 

Next year’s conference will be in South Africa in September, and will be a great opportunity for learning with colleagues from around the world.


About the author 

Crystal Oldman

 

 

 

Crystal Oldman is chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute 
 

 

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