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Crystal Oldman: act now to prevent more nurses leaving the profession

Skilled leadership, support from role models and clear career pathways are crucial to retaining valuable nursing staff, says Queen’s Nursing Institute chief executive Crystal Oldman.
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Skilled leadership, support from role models and clear career pathways are crucial to retaining valuable nursing staff, says Queens Nursing Institute chief executive Crystal Oldman

Nurses have more career choices than ever been before, with practitioners moving into commissioning roles, residential care and social care, as well as between NHS service providers.

This is one of the benefits of a flexible, professional career, so it is a tragedy that many nurses are choosing to leave the profession or take early retirement, resulting in a huge loss of knowledge, skills and expertise in the sector.

Staff retention remains a major concern for the nursing profession, and we need to be mindful of the reasons why nurses leave. Nurses need to feel supported and valued in their roles, and have

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Skilled leadership, support from role models and clear career pathways are crucial to retaining valuable nursing staff, says Queen’s Nursing Institute chief executive Crystal Oldman

leave
Nurses need clear career pathways that support professional development
and maintain work-life balance.     Picture: iStock

Nurses have more career choices than ever been before, with practitioners moving into commissioning roles, residential care and social care, as well as between NHS service providers. 

This is one of the benefits of a flexible, professional career, so it is a tragedy that many nurses are choosing to leave the profession or take early retirement, resulting in a huge loss of knowledge, skills and expertise in the sector. 

Staff retention remains a major concern for the nursing profession, and we need to be mindful of the reasons why nurses leave. Nurses need to feel supported and valued in their roles, and have sufficient time and resources to deliver quality patient care. When these are lacking, it can act as a catalyst for nurses to seek alternative employment. 

Inspiration

Nurses also need clear career pathways that support professional development and maintain work-life balance, with skilled leadership and support from role models – who will share their expertise and inspire innovative thinking – key to achieving this. 

The Queens Nursing Institute is currently supporting 12 Queen’s Nurses to develop their leadership skills, focus on excellent nursing care, and inspire the current, and next, generation of nurses. 

Their commitment to delivering high quality care in the complex and often challenging environments of community and primary care is palpable. Their inspirational leadership will support staff retention in the many and various areas in which they work, now and in the future.


Crystal Oldman is chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute 

 

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