News

UK cancer rates rising nearly six times faster in women than men

Figures released by Cancer Research UK have highlighted potentially bad lifestyle factors causing rising cancer rates in women.
Bad lifestyle choice

Figures released by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) have highlighted potentially bad lifestyle factors causing rising cancer rates in women

Cancer rates will rise nearly six times faster in women than men in the next 20 years, according to the figures.

The charity found that cancer rates will increase by 0.54% for men but 3.18% for women.

Based on a 2016 British Journal of Cancer report on cancer incidence and mortality projections in the UK until 2035, CRUK calculated that around 4.5 million women and 4.8 million men will be diagnosed with cancer between 2015 and 2035.

Lifestyle factors

Obesity and smoking are linked to the faster rising rates in women, according to CRUK.

Several of the obesity-related cancer types, such as womb cancer and ovarian cancer, only occur in women.

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Figures released by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) have highlighted potentially bad lifestyle factors causing rising cancer rates in women

Cancer rates will rise nearly six times faster in women than men in the next 20 years, according to the figures. 

The charity found that cancer rates will increase by 0.54% for men but 3.18% for women.

Based on a 2016 British Journal of Cancer report on cancer incidence and mortality projections in the UK until 2035, CRUK calculated that around 4.5 million women and 4.8 million men will be diagnosed with cancer between 2015 and 2035.

Lifestyle factors

Bad lifestyle choice
Picture: iStock

Obesity and smoking are linked to the faster rising rates in women, according to CRUK.

Several of the obesity-related cancer types, such as womb cancer and ovarian cancer, only occur in women.

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust bariatric advanced nurse practitioner Lisa Rickers warned that conversations with patients about weight management should be handled sensitively. 

She said: ‘Any clinical contact you have, you should be able to raise some of these issues. 

‘It might not always be appropriate in an acute setting, if the patient’s focus is on something else, it might not be the right time. 

‘It could be saying to someone: “Do you want to come back on a different day and we can have a chat about it?”'

Starting point

Ms Rickers added: ‘I find it is easier as a starting point to ask people how they feel about their weight? What are their views before providing advice?’

The charity also said widespread smoking happened later among women than men and it continues to have a big effect on cancer cases each year. 

Breast cancer cases are expected to rise from 54,833 in 2014 to 71,022 in 2035, according to CRUK figures. Ovarian cancer cases are expected to increase from 7,367 to 10,500.

CRUK published its figures ahead of World Cancer Day tomorrow, when it encourages fundraising across the country.


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs