News

Teenager who survived Manchester Arena bomb blast wants to become a nurse

Eve Senior praised the work of the nurses who looked after her and wants to join the profession. 

A teenager who was injured in the Manchester Arena bombing earlier this year has revealed she wants to become a nurse.

Eve Senior, who attended the Ariana Grande concert with her younger sister was metres away from bomber Salman Abedi when he detonated a bomb, killing 22 people.

Ms Senior, who is 14, appeared on the front pages of many newspapers after the attack, half her jeans had been cut off by paramedics and she needed help to walk because of 14 shrapnel wounds she had suffered.

Encouraging

Once at hospital, staff operated to remove the shards of metal from her legs. She told the BBC that the staff at Manchester Children's Hospital were so good at their jobs it has encouraged her to

A teenager who was injured in the Manchester Arena bombing earlier this year has revealed she wants to become a nurse.


Eve Senior. Picture: BBC 

Eve Senior, who attended the Ariana Grande concert with her younger sister was metres away from bomber Salman Abedi when he detonated a bomb, killing 22 people.

Ms Senior, who is 14, appeared on the front pages of many newspapers after the attack, half her jeans had been cut off by paramedics and she needed help to walk because of 14 shrapnel wounds she had suffered. 

Encouraging

Once at hospital, staff operated to remove the shards of metal from her legs. She told the BBC that the staff at Manchester Children's Hospital were so good at their jobs it has encouraged her to become a nurse.

She said: 'Before Manchester I had no idea what I wanted to be when I grow up. But staying in hospital and seeing what the nurses do, and how good they are – when I'm older I want to be a nurse. '

Her sister Emilia, now 12, had her hearing damaged in one ear as a result of the blast, but escaped other injuries. 

The family was offered the chance to visit Manchester Arena before its scheduled reopening. 

Eve said: 'I was scared to go. I was crying before I even went in. But as soon as I got in there, you felt more calm.'

Fundraising commitment

The family have found the time to hold fundraising events for the Manchester Emergency Fund and Victim Support.

Mr Senior told the BBC he constantly thinks about the fathers whose children did not survive: 'It changes your perspective on things. We're always going to have Manchester as a part of our family now.'

Further information

Well-being advice issued for those affected by Manchester terror attack


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs