News

Regional trauma centre boosts survival rates by more than half

More patients are surviving life-threatening injuries thanks to a regional trauma network.
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust

More patients are surviving life-threatening injuries in the south of England thanks to a regional trauma network.

Southampton General Hospital is one of only 12 centres across England to offer a full range of specialist surgical, intensive care and support service for both adults and children as part of the Wessex Trauma Network.

A recent independent investigation by the Trauma Audit and Research Network found patients have a 63% increased chance of survival after arriving at Southampton General Hospital's major trauma centre with life-threatening injuries.

It also revealed for every 100 patients treated, an additional 0.7 were surviving compared to before the centre opened in 2012.

24/7 on-site leaders

Last year, the centre saw 571 patients

More patients are surviving life-threatening injuries in the south of England thanks to a regional trauma network.

Regional trauma centre boosts survival
The new entrance of Southampton General Hospital (also known as University Hospital Southampton) which opened July 2016
Picture: University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
 

Southampton General Hospital is one of only 12 centres across England to offer a full range of specialist surgical, intensive care and support service for both adults and children as part of the Wessex Trauma Network.

A recent independent investigation by the Trauma Audit and Research Network found patients have a 63% increased chance of survival after arriving at Southampton General Hospital's major trauma centre with life-threatening injuries.

It also revealed for every 100 patients treated, an additional 0.7 were surviving compared to before the centre opened in 2012.

24/7 on-site leaders

Last year, the centre saw 571 patients with immediately life-threatening injuries, compared to 272 in 2012. The centre also saw 419 patients with potentially life-changing injuries, compared to 226 in 2012.

Emergency department consultants and senior trauma team leaders are now on-site 24/7, while nine emergency and anaesthetic doctors also fly regularly with the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air Ambulance team.

Together, seven units and two ambulance services from the Wessex Trauma Network which welcomed the report at its annual conference last month.

App provides instant advice

Among the technology used by staff is a smartphone app designed by two local anaesthetists to provide instant advice and guidance on treating a range of trauma injuries.

Director of major trauma at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust Mark Baxter said: ‘The development of major trauma centres and networks have ensured patients are treated by the right clinicians in the right locations as quickly as possible and that is why we are seeing such fantastic improvements in survival.’

 

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