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PPE: Morecambe Bay Hood lets nurses communicate while staying safe from COVID-19

The device was developed by the local NHS trust, commercial sewing firm Lancastle and BAE Systems
Morecambe Bay Hood

The device was developed by the local NHS trust, commercial sewing firm Lancastle and BAE Systems

Nursing staff at a hospital trust can communicate more clearly with patients and colleagues thanks to a ‘game-changing’ personal protective equipment (PPE) hood.

The reusable full-face hood, sported by staff at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT), has a see-through panel to aid communication and delivers a continuous stream of clean filtered air to the wearer.

PPE that is safe, practical and efficient

Dubbed the Morecambe Bay Hood, eight are being used by staff working in the intensive care unit and on

The device was developed by the local NHS trust, commercial sewing firm Lancastle and BAE Systems

Matron Sally Young demonstrates the PPE hood Picture: UHMBT

Nursing staff at a hospital trust can communicate more clearly with patients and colleagues thanks to a ‘game-changing’ personal protective equipment (PPE) hood.

The reusable full-face hood, sported by staff at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT), has a see-through panel to aid communication and delivers a continuous stream of clean filtered air to the wearer.

PPE that is safe, practical and efficient

Dubbed the Morecambe Bay Hood, eight are being used by staff working in the intensive care unit and on respiratory medicine wards.

The design was created by engineers from aerospace company BAE Systems, staff from local commercial sewing contractor Lancastle and staff from UHMBT.

Nurse Megan Murphree, clinical leader on the Lancaster Suite at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary, said the hood was safe, practical and efficient to wear.

‘It makes us feel looked after and that the trust care about their staff,’ she added.

Finding ways to connect with patients while wearing protective masks

Trust head of resilience and patient flow Stuart Hosking-Durn said: ‘The Morecambe Bay Hood will be an absolute game-changer for us as we continue to care for patients, significantly improving comfort, durability and communication.’

Throughout the pandemic, staff and employers have come up with innovative ways to connect with patients while wearing essential PPE.

Staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in Norfolk placed photographs of staff on a board on wards to help patients identify with the person behind the mask, while others stuck pictures to the front of their gowns.

Meanwhile, the paediatric emergency assessment unit at Salford Royal Hospital introduced cartoon characters to visors to calm children’s nerves.


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