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Nurse took his own life following dismissal from job he loved, inquest hears

An inquest heard details about the death of nurse Amin Abdullah who set himself alight in February last year.
Amin_Abdullah_tile.jpg

A nurse who set himself alight outside Kensington Palace took his own life, while the balance of his mind was disturbed, an inquest has heard.

Amin Abdullah, described by friends as a caring, courageous and dedicated nurse, died in February 2016 after becoming depressed after losing his job at Londons Charing Cross Hospital.

A three-day inquest at Westminster Coroners Court heard how problems began when Mr Abdullah had written a letter for a colleague to assist in her response to a complaint lodged by a patient.

He had also signed a petition in support of her, resulting in him becoming involved in the issue, and disciplinary proceedings being taken against him in September 2015.

Coroner Shirley Radcliffe said the investigation undertaken by his employers, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, took a number of

A nurse who set himself alight outside Kensington Palace took his own life, ‘while the balance of his mind was disturbed’, an inquest has heard.


Amin Abdullah was said to have loved his job.

Amin Abdullah, described by friends as a caring, courageous and dedicated nurse, died in February 2016 after becoming depressed after losing his job at London’s Charing Cross Hospital.

A three-day inquest at Westminster Coroner’s Court heard how problems began when Mr Abdullah had written a letter for a colleague to assist in her response to a complaint lodged by a patient.

He had also signed a petition in support of her, resulting in him becoming involved in the issue, and disciplinary proceedings being taken against him in September 2015.

Coroner Shirley Radcliffe said the investigation undertaken by his employers, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, took a number of weeks.

Delayed investigation 

The inquest heard there was a 93-day gap between the initial meeting and the disciplinary hearing.

Summarising the case, the coroner said the Malaysian-born nurse became suicidal after he was dismissed from the job he loved.

Dr Radcliffe added: ‘He undoubtedly suffered stress on being informed of the investigation and the lack of information from the trust. We know they have apologised for that delay.’

Following a disciplinary hearing on 16 December 2015, the inquest heard how during the middle of his shift on December 21 he was informed he was ‘dismissed and needed to leave the hospital’.

‘Triggered’ decline

‘He said he felt his whole life was over, there was nothing else in his life and nothing to live for,’ Dr Radcliffe said.

Dr Radcliffe said she was ‘unable to identify an action’ that would have prevented Mr Abdullah’s death.

An Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust spokesperson said: 'Trust managers and staff were very saddened by what happened to Amin Abdullah.

 'The trust accepts that there were delays in the disciplinary process and has apologised for this.

 'We have improved our disciplinary processes to ensure cases are conducted as quickly as possible. We have also introduced new measures so that senior managers are alerted if a case is taking too long to conclude. They will ensure action is taken to quickly move it forward.'

Speaking after the inquest, Mr Abdullah’s partner Terry Skitmore said he believed the disciplinary process ‘triggered’ Mr Abdullah’s decline which he feels was compounded by delays and lack of communication.

A JustGiving donation page has been set up by Mr Skitmore and friends of Mr Abdullah and all money raised will go to the Cavell Nurses’ Trust.

For confidential support on mental health, call the Samaritans on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org or visit a Samaritans branch.


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