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Nurse killed in Blitz finally receives marked grave

The final resting place of a nurse killed during World War Two has been properly marked following a two-year campaign.
JOAN

The final resting place of a nurse killed during World War Two has been properly marked following a two-year campaign.

Agatha Joan Credland was caring for sick and wounded servicemen in the Westminster-Withers wing of St Marys Hospital in East London on 7 September 1940 the first day of the Blitz.

The hospital suffered a direct hit, which killed 21-year-old Ms Credland along with a colleague and six patients.

Taken home

Her body was transported to her hometown of Sturton-by-Stow in Lincolnshire, but buried in an unmarked grave at Stow Church, possibly because of lack of money.

However, when the villages memorial of both world wars was unveiled, Ms Credlands name was included alongside 39 others all men.

In 2014, Sturton-by-Stow history society

The final resting place of a nurse killed during World War Two has been properly marked following a two-year campaign.


Agatha Joan Credland died aged 21, while nursing
wounded servicemen during the Blitz.

Agatha Joan Credland was caring for sick and wounded servicemen in the Westminster-Withers wing of St Mary’s Hospital in East London on 7 September 1940 – the first day of the Blitz.

The hospital suffered a direct hit, which killed 21-year-old Ms Credland along with a colleague and six patients.

Taken home 

Her body was transported to her hometown of Sturton-by-Stow in Lincolnshire, but buried in an unmarked grave at Stow Church, possibly because of lack of money.

However, when the village’s memorial of both world wars was unveiled, Ms Credland’s name was included alongside 39 others – all men.

In 2014, Sturton-by-Stow history society member Terry Marker researched the final resting place of all 40 names, and found hers was the only unknown.

Tribute she deserves 

History society chairman Clive Thompson said: ‘Nurse Credland trained locally at Gringley on the Hill Hospital, but it would have been a big decision at the time to move to London.

‘It’s nice to be able to pay her the tribute she deserves.’

Mr Thompson enlisted the help of fellow members Charles Hewitt and David Justham, and together they consulted parish plans to work out the precise location Ms Credland was put to rest.

Earlier this month the society, parish councillors and descendants of Ms Credland’s family – including her niece Rita Willford – gathered at the graveside to see its new headstone officially unveiled.

Ms Credland’s name is also listed on a special window, dedicated to all nurses killed during the war, located inside a chapel at Westminster Abbey.

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