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Nurse creates wound app to help carers identify and treat pressure ulcers

Digital tool designed to provide ‘clear and simple’ information for carers and care home workers 
Wound app on a mobile phone for carers and care home workers to help identify and treat pressure ulcers

Digital tool designed to provide clear and simple information for carers and care home workers

A community matron has helped to create an app that enables carers and care home workers to identify and act quickly to treat pressure ulcers.

Queen's Nurse Sarah Stringer, who is part of East London Foundation Trusts Bedfordshire community health services team, put together the information for the clear and simple educational tool.

Visual guide shows the varying stages of pressure sores

The app and a printed version of the tool illustrate the different stages of pressure sores.

The visual guide is also available on the

Digital tool designed to provide ‘clear and simple’ information for carers and care home workers


Picture: iStock

A community matron has helped to create an app that enables carers and care home workers to identify and act quickly to treat pressure ulcers.

Queen's Nurse Sarah Stringer, who is part of East London Foundation Trust’s Bedfordshire community health services team, put together the information for the ‘clear and simple’ educational tool.

Visual guide shows the varying stages of pressure sores

The app and a printed version of the tool illustrate the different stages of pressure sores.

The visual guide is also available on the NHS Improvement Stop the Pressure website. 

The digital project was led by Ms Stringer, working in partnership with Bedford Borough Council, Bedfordshire Care Group Ltd and Digitwell Solutions. The tool is aimed at carers and care home workers, who support people with the highest risk of developing pressure ulcers. 


    Community matron Sarah Stringer

    ‘My hope has always been that by working in partnership with colleagues and organisations we can make a genuine change, protect the vulnerable and improve their lives and well-being by reducing pressure ulcers,’ said Ms Stringer.

    ‘I feel a tremendous sense of pride in what has been achieved so far and also a responsibility to continue working to increase awareness and understanding of this issue.’

    App includes tips on how to prevent pressure ulcers

    The app features a pressure ulcer grading chart, tips on how to prevent pressure ulcers and what to do if there are signs of pressure damage, including:

    • Frequent skin inspection during every episode of care.
    • Ensuring an appropriate repositioning regimen is in place and documented.
    • Implementing a food and fluid chart.

    The project started as part of Ms Stringer's district nursing master’s degree studies and the educational tool was first designed as a laminated leaflet.

    A pilot project was run in central Bedfordshire for six months and focused on care home staff.

    The app is now available for free to download on Google Play and the App Store.


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