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Nurse academic leading study into effects of manuka honey

Study will examine whether stoma bags made using manuka honey can reduce skin irritation.
Manuka Honey

Study will examine whether stoma bags made using manuka honey can reduce skin irritation

Most stoma bags contain a gelling agent called hydrocolloid which acts as a barrier to protect the skin from bodily fluids, however some patients can become sensitive to it and experience skin problems.

Now University of Southampton associate professor of nursing David Voegeli is leading a study to see if honey produced by bees taking nectar from manuka flowers native to New Zealand can prevent complications.

Manuka honey is thought to help ease irritation and moisturise the skin.

Stoma trial

Dr Vogeli is looking to recruit 30 healthy volunteers with stomas to take part in an 8-week trial of both standard and honey stomas.

'Good skin care around stoma sites is important to reduce the risk of skin problems. But at the moment about 80%

Study will examine whether stoma bags made using manuka honey can reduce skin irritation

Picture: iStockphoto

Most stoma bags contain a gelling agent called hydrocolloid which acts as a barrier to protect the skin from bodily fluids, however some patients can become sensitive to it and experience skin problems.

Now University of Southampton associate professor of nursing David Voegeli is leading a study to see if honey produced by bees taking nectar from manuka flowers native to New Zealand can prevent complications.

Manuka honey is thought to help ease irritation and moisturise the skin.

Stoma trial

Dr Vogeli is looking to recruit 30 healthy volunteers with stomas to take part in an 8-week trial of both standard and honey stomas.

'Good skin care around stoma sites is important to reduce the risk of skin problems. But at the moment about 80% of people with stomas will experience skin problems,' Dr Voegeli said.

'Honey is thought to help reduce the inflammation that can cause skin problems and moisturises the skin, which can provide added protection.

'However, there is no firm evidence to demonstrate this as of yet, so we are hoping this study will prove whether or not this is the case and help to ensure patients have access to the best option for them.'

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