News

My Daddy is a Nurse: the children’s book challenging gender stereotypes

Nursing Now campaign and chief nurse work with publisher to tackle profession’s gender divide
My Daddy is a Nurse, by Butterfly Books, challenges gender stereotypes about nursing

Nursing Now campaign and chief nurse work with publisher to tackle the professions gender divide

A childrens book that challenges gender stereotypes about nurses has been launched by Englands chief nurse Ruth May, in partnership with the global Nursing Now campaign.

My Daddy is a Nurse, aimed at 4-7 year olds, is from Butterfly Books, a publishing house set up to tackle misconceptions that reinforce gender divides in professions. Previous titles from the publisher include My Mummy is a Plumber, My Mummy is a Scientist and My Mummy is a Soldier.

Stereotypes deter men from considering a career in nursing

Dr May said nursing has been considered a woman-only role for too long.

We are committed to overturning the

Nursing Now campaign and chief nurse work with publisher to tackle the profession’s gender divide

My Daddy is a Nurse, by Butterfly Books, challenges gender stereotypes about nursing

A children’s book that challenges gender stereotypes about nurses has been launched by England’s chief nurse Ruth May, in partnership with the global Nursing Now campaign.

My Daddy is a Nurse, aimed at 4-7 year olds, is from Butterfly Books, a publishing house set up to tackle misconceptions that reinforce gender divides in professions. Previous titles from the publisher include My Mummy is a Plumber, My Mummy is a Scientist and My Mummy is a Soldier.

‘Stereotypes deter men from considering a career in nursing’

Dr May said nursing has been considered a woman-only role for too long.

‘We are committed to overturning the longstanding stereotypes that have historically deterred men from considering a career in nursing,’ she said.

‘Our partnership with Butterfly Books will see My Daddy is a Nurse provoke much-needed discussion, challenge biased norms and recast a tired narrative that has – for too long – positioned women exclusively for such jobs.’

According to the latest Nursing and Midwifery Council data, almost 11% of the UK’s 706,252 registered nurses, midwives and nursing associates identified as male.


Further information

Butterfly Books


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs