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More MS nurses could reduce rising A&E admissions

New analysis shows the number of emergency department admissions for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) continues to rise, costing the NHS millions.
A&E_wait-Alamy.jpg

New analysis shows the number of emergency department admissions for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) continues to rise, costing the NHS millions.

The report, published by Wilmington Healthcare and the charity MS Trust, used NHS Digital data to highlight the need for more preventative care for MS patients.

Emergency hospital admissions for people with MS in England increased by 12.7% over two years to 2015-16.

There were 26,679 emergency hospital admissions for people with MS in England in 2015-16, compared to 23,665 in 2013-14, with an average length of stay of 8.2 days, costing the NHS a total of 46 million.

Urinary tract infections accounted for 14% of emergency admissions.

Flexible care

MS Trust chief executive Pam Macfarlane said: 'It is

New analysis shows the number of emergency department admissions for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) continues to rise, costing the NHS millions.


NHS Digital data showed avoidable emergency hospital admissions for people with
MS have continued to rise. Picture: Alamy 

The report, published by Wilmington Healthcare and the charity MS Trust, used NHS Digital data to highlight the need for more preventative care for MS patients.

Emergency hospital admissions for people with MS in England increased by 12.7% over two years to 2015-16.

There were 26,679 emergency hospital admissions for people with MS in England in 2015-16, compared to 23,665 in 2013-14, with an average length of stay of 8.2 days, costing the NHS a total of £46 million.

Urinary tract infections accounted for 14% of emergency admissions.

Flexible care 

MS Trust chief executive Pam Macfarlane said: 'It is disappointing to see that avoidable emergency hospital admissions for people with MS have continued to rise in 2015-16.'

She said the MS Forward View consensus showed people with MS need flexible care, including proactive symptom management and neurorehabilitation, delivered by multidisciplinary teams.

'This is one reason why we are now funding additional MS nurses in areas of the UK where services are the most overstretched. Only with the right specialist and community-based support will we reduce the need for emergency hospital care for people with MS,' Ms Mcfarlane added.

It is 25 years since the first specialist MS nurses started work.

Wilmington Healthcare Commissioning Excellence Directorate chief executive Sue Thomas said preventative care strategies would not only be of huge benefit to patients, but would also reduce pressure on emergency departments.


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