News

Majority of hospice care is community-based

Research by the charity Hospice UK reveals that less than a fifth of hospice care for adults is delivered in inpatient units
Hospice care

Eighty per cent of hospice care for adults is provided in a range of community settings, with less than a fifth delivered in hospice inpatient units, according to a new report.

Analysis by Hospice UK revealed the wide range of settings in which hospice care is provided, including in patients homes, day hospices or outpatient hospice care.

The charity said its findings showed that extending end of life care in the community is essential.

In 2015-16, 159,000 adults received community hospice services; 54,000 accessed outpatient hospice care and 35,000 day hospice care.

This accounted for 80% of care provided, with only 14% of adults (48,000) receiving hospice care in an inpatient hospice unit, according to the report.

Not reaching everyone

But it

Eighty per cent of hospice care for adults is provided in a range of community settings, with less than a fifth delivered in hospice inpatient units, according to a new report.


Only 14% of adults receive hospice care in an inpatient hospice unit, according to
the report. Picture: iStock

Analysis by Hospice UK revealed the wide range of settings in which hospice care is provided, including in patients’ homes, day hospices or outpatient hospice care. 

The charity said its findings showed that extending end of life care in the community is essential.

In 2015-16, 159,000 adults received community hospice services; 54,000 accessed outpatient hospice care and 35,000 day hospice care. 

This accounted for 80% of care provided, with only 14% of adults (48,000) receiving hospice care in an inpatient hospice unit, according to the report. 

Not reaching everyone

But it also showed that an estimated 100,000 people in the UK who need expert end of life care will not get the right support. 

Diane Laverty, a nurse consultant in palliative care at St Joseph’s Hospice in London, said: ‘We know that we do not reach everybody.

‘We have a finite number of resources and we have to be careful, we think a lot about equity of access.’

Being more mindful of patients’ needs and, where appropriate, withdrawing care for a period of time if it is not needed, could allow more people to receive palliative care, she added. 

National Council for Palliative Care chief executive Claire Henry said: ‘We all deserve good quality end of life care, of which hospice care will always be a vital part, and we cannot rest until this is the case.’

The report is based on analysis of the minimum data set for specialist palliative care services, which is produced annually and covers England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

The charity also analysed its own data on Scottish hospices to give a UK-wide picture.


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs