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Google Doodle honours iconic nurse Mary Seacole

Pioneering 19th century nurse Mary Seacole has been honoured by Google, with a logo featuring the Jamaican-born icon on its homepage
Google

Pioneering 19th century nurse Mary Seacole has been honoured by Google, with a logo featuring the Jamaican-born icon on its homepage.

Google changes the logo, known as the Google Doodle, to celebrate holidays as well as the anniversaries of famous people and events.

The Google Doodle shows Mrs Seacole walking through the rain carrying a lamp and a bag.

Mrs Seacole, who was born in 1805 and died in 1881, set up the British Hotel near Balaclava to provide soldiers with food and care during the Crimean War.

Greatest black Briton

The nurse also cared for victims of cholera in Jamaica and Panama in the 1850s, and of a yellow fever epidemic in 1853.

She supervised British army nursing services in Jamaica and was named the

Pioneering 19th century nurse Mary Seacole has been honoured by Google, with a logo featuring the Jamaican-born icon on its homepage.


Nurse Mary Seacole was named the greatest black Briton in a 2004 poll.

Google changes the logo, known as the Google Doodle, to celebrate holidays as well as the anniversaries of famous people and events.

The Google Doodle shows Mrs Seacole walking through the rain carrying a lamp and a bag.

Mrs Seacole, who was born in 1805 and died in 1881, set up the British Hotel near Balaclava to provide soldiers with food and care during the Crimean War.

Greatest black Briton 

The nurse also cared for victims of cholera in Jamaica and Panama in the 1850s, and of a yellow fever epidemic in 1853.

She supervised British army nursing services in Jamaica and was named the greatest black Briton in a 2004 poll.

Compliments about the logo have spread across social media, ranging from American-British playwright Bonnie Greer to NHS England.

A documentary about Mrs Seacole and the story behind a statue created in her memory is to be screened on ITV.

TV show follows nurse's life 

In the Shadow of Mary Seacole follows actor David Harewood, who starred in Homeland and The Night Manager, on a 3-year journey across Britain, Jamaica and Crimea, where Mrs Seacole was based.

A bronze statue of the nurse was unveiled in July in the grounds of St Thomas’ Hospital, following a 12-year campaign raising more than £500,000.

The statue, created by sculptor Martin Jennings, is the first to be named after a black woman in the UK.

Mary Seacole Memorial Statue Appeal chair Lord Soley said: ‘The film really brings Mary Seacole’s story to life and provides a fascinating insight into how the statue was created.’

In the Shadow of Mary Seacole will show on Tuesday, 18th October from 10.40pm-11.40pm on ITV.

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