We are aware some users might find it difficult to log into our site. We are working on this issue and hope to have it resolved shortly.
News

Ebola nurse receives honorary degree

British nurse Will Pooley has received an honorary degree from the University of Essex for his voluntary work with Ebola patients in the West African country of Sierra Leone
william pooley

British nurse Will Pooley gets an honorary degree from the University of Essex for his work with Ebola patients in Sierra Leone

A British nurse who survived the Ebola virus has received an honorary degree from the University of Essex.

Will Pooley contracted the virus in 2014, six weeks after volunteering at an Ebola clinic in Sierra Leone.

Following treatment with experimental drug ZMapp at London’s Royal Free Hospital, Mr Pooley returned to the country to help.

University of Essex head of nursing Martin Harrison called Mr Pooley ‘a role model’ and ‘true nursing professional’.

Mr Harrison said: ‘There are few people who would narrowly survive the deadly Ebola virus only to get straight back out to the infectious area to try and save more lives.

‘This is a man who does not fall at the first hurdle, but follows his calling whatever

William Pooley
British nurse Will Pooley gets an honorary degree from the University of Essex for his work with Ebola patients in Sierra Leone
 

A British nurse who survived the Ebola virus has received an honorary degree from the University of Essex.

Will Pooley contracted the virus in 2014, six weeks after volunteering at an Ebola clinic in Sierra Leone.

Following treatment with experimental drug ZMapp at London’s Royal Free Hospital, Mr Pooley returned to the country to help.

University of Essex head of nursing Martin Harrison called Mr Pooley ‘a role model’ and ‘true nursing professional’.

Mr Harrison said: ‘There are few people who would narrowly survive the deadly Ebola virus only to get straight back out to the infectious area to try and save more lives.

‘This is a man who does not fall at the first hurdle, but follows his calling whatever the cost.’

Airlifted to the UK, Mr Pooley was given experimental drug ZMapp at an isolation unit at London’s Royal Free Hospital.

‘Put all the joy you have in your heart into the care of other people,’ Mr Pooley advised others after the graduation ceremony.

Listen to William on the necessity - and joy - of nursing in Sierra Leone (1 min)

 

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Nursing Standard
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs