News

Cyclospora outbreak sparks warning to health workers

Health workers are being given access to information and advice about the food and water bug Cyclospora after an outbreak traced to Mexico. 148 cases of Cyclospora have been linked to travellers who have recently returned from Mexico's Riviera Maya coast. Image: iStock     
Mexican resort

Health workers are being given access to information and advice about the food and water bug Cyclospora after an outbreak traced to Mexico.

Public Health England (PHE) has acted after 204 cases of infection were reported in the UK since June, 148 of which from travellers who had recently returned from the Riviera Maya coast.

The average number of cases a year is 32.

Deputy director of the National Travel Health Network and Centre Vanessa Field urged health workers to remind travellers to Mexico to follow good food and water hygiene advice even if staying in high-end, all-inclusive resorts.

Symptoms

Symptoms typically begin 7 days after ingestion of sporulated oocysts (the infective form of the parasite).

Some have a flu-like illness for a few days initially, followed by rapid onset of frequent, watery diarrhoea, abdominal cramping, and nausea.

Individuals with underlying immune deficiency can

Health workers are being given access to information and advice about the food and water bug Cyclospora after an outbreak traced to Mexico.

Public Health England (PHE) has acted after 204 cases of infection were reported in the UK since June, 148 of which from travellers who had recently returned from the Riviera Maya coast.

The average number of cases a year is 32.

Deputy director of the National Travel Health Network and Centre Vanessa Field urged health workers to remind travellers to Mexico to follow good food and water hygiene advice ‘even if staying in high-end, all-inclusive resorts’.

Symptoms

Symptoms typically begin 7 days after ingestion of sporulated oocysts (the infective form of the parasite).

Some have a flu-like illness for a few days initially, followed by rapid onset of frequent, watery diarrhoea, abdominal cramping, and nausea.

Individuals with underlying immune deficiency can be at risk of more severe infection.

Diagnosis is made by undertaking stool microscopy.

While most cases resolve on their own, antibiotics can be given to treat severe or prolonged infections.

 

Cyclospora advice for health professionals

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs