News

Continuity of care is what gives us job satisfaction, say older people's nurses

Most older people’s nurses value the ability to make a difference to an individual’s life, survey finds

Older peoples nurses challenge any perception that working in their sector is an inferior career choice, a survey suggests.

In a survey of RCN members, 82% of older peoples nurses said their careers gave them an opportunity to work with complex health issues.

Three-quarters of the respondents to the Care to Care survey said they enjoyed the broad range of their practice and 81% said they chose older people's nursing because they can give continuity of care.

Confidence and training

A total of 873 RCN members working in nursing, managerial and support roles in the care sector completed the survey.

Nine out of ten felt they had sufficient training and 92% said they


Picture: iStock

Older people’s nurses challenge any perception that working in their sector is an inferior career choice, a survey suggests.

In a survey of RCN members, 82% of older people’s nurses said their careers gave them an opportunity to work with complex health issues.

Three-quarters of the respondents to the Care to Care survey said they enjoyed the broad range of their practice and 81% said they chose older people's nursing because they can give continuity of care.

Confidence and training

A total of 873 RCN members working in nursing, managerial and support roles in the care sector completed the survey.

Nine out of ten felt they had sufficient training and 92% said they were confident in their practice.

A total of 54% of respondents said they worked in or for care homes and 90% agreed or strongly agreed that making a difference to the life of an older person had attracted them to their career.

Roles more important than ever

RCN professional lead for the care of older people and dementia Dawne Garrett said: ‘With the population getting older, older people’s care nursing is becoming more important than ever before and it’s vital we attract the right people to the role.

‘These findings will inspire current nurses and those new to the profession to consider a career in the field. It is a flexible, varied and above all highly rewarding career, empowering individuals to make a tangible difference to the lives of older people.’

Joan Elliott, managing director of Bupa Care Homes, which conducted the survey, said: ‘It’s great to see nurses acknowledge the variety of clinical and personal skills involved in working with older people, and it’s vital that we dispel the misconception that these roles are less clinical or slower-paced.

'As the research shows, older people’s nursing can be a hugely rewarding career, and I hope this encourages more people to consider it.’


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs