Journal scan

Weight problems linked to poor oral hygiene

Obesity may be linked to an increased likelihood of poor oral health
bmi

Obesity may be linked to an increased likelihood of poor oral health

Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased likelihood of having poor oral health, a new study has found.

Scientists from Thailand and Japan studied 160 Thai people who were examined for oral diseases.

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 and above, making them overweight (25 to 30) or obese (30 plus), were almost six times more likely to have severe periodontitis compared with those with a normal BMI.

The experts suggested altered inflammatory molecules associated with obesity may play a role.

Healthy BMI

They wrote: This interplay may enhance the risk of cardiovascular disease in overweight or obese individuals, and greater interaction between dental and medical professionals is required.

Findings also showed people with a lower BMI were at risk.

NHS Choices describes

...

Obesity may be linked to an increased likelihood of poor oral health

Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased likelihood of having poor oral health, a new study has found.

Scientists from Thailand and Japan studied 160 Thai people who were examined for oral diseases.

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 and above, making them overweight (25 to 30) or obese (30 plus), were almost six times more likely to have severe periodontitis compared with those with a normal BMI.

The experts suggested altered inflammatory molecules associated with obesity may play a role.

Healthy BMI

They wrote: ‘This interplay may enhance the risk of cardiovascular disease in overweight or obese individuals, and greater interaction between dental and medical professionals is required.’

Findings also showed people with a lower BMI were at risk.

NHS Choices describes a BMI score of 18.5 to 25 as healthy. Less than 18.5 is described as underweight.

The study revealed no significant association between obesity and missing teeth.


Thanakun S et al (2017) Increased oral inflammation, leukocytes, and leptin, and lower adiponectin in overweight or obesity. Oral Diseases. doi:10.1111/odi.12679

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs