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Vaccination campaigns make parents more sceptical

Strategies for correcting misinformation about the dangers of vaccinations have the opposite effect and reinforce ill-founded beliefs, suggesting that public health campaigns need more testing, a study says.
mmr

Strategies for correcting misinformation about the dangers of vaccinations have the opposite effect and reinforce ill-founded beliefs, suggesting that public health campaigns need more testing, a study says

Current strategies for correcting misinformation about the dangers of vaccinations have the opposite effect and reinforce ill-founded beliefs, a study suggests.

Presenting scientific facts to disprove misconceptions was found to actually strengthen unfounded opinions, such as that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine causes autism, it says.

Similarly, showing images that suggest unvaccinated children can develop disease inspired the strongest belief that vaccines had harmful side effects.

A survey of 120 people in Scotland and Italy measured attitudes towards misconceptions about the MMR vaccine and asked them whether they would give the vaccine to their child.

Different approaches

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