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Too much TV causes lung blood clot deaths

A Japanese study has uncovered the fatal consequences of sitting too long in front of the TV
TV watching

Watching lots of TV may increase the likelihood of dying from a blood clot in the lung.

Lung blood clots, also known as pulmonary embolisms, usually stem from clots in the leg or pelvis after inactivity has slowed down blood flow. It is particularly dangerous if the clot travels to the lung and lodges in a small blood vessel.

Between 1988 to 1990 Japanese researchers asked 86,024 40-79 year olds in Japan to log the hours that they had spent watching TV. Over the period being observed 59 of those in the study died of a pulmonary embolism.

The researchers found that compared with people watching less than 2.5 hours TV a day, pulmonary embolism deaths increased 70% in people watching between 2.5 to 4.9 hours TV and an extra 40% for each additional two hours of TV watched per day. Deaths increased 2.5 times when people

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Watching lots of TV may increase the likelihood of dying from a blood clot in the lung.

Lung blood clots, also known as pulmonary embolisms, usually stem from clots in the leg or pelvis after inactivity has slowed down blood flow. It is particularly dangerous if the clot travels to the lung and lodges in a small blood vessel.

Between 1988 to 1990 Japanese researchers asked 86,024 40-79 year olds in Japan to log the hours that they had spent watching TV. Over the period being observed 59 of those in the study died of a pulmonary embolism.

The researchers found that compared with people watching less than 2.5 hours TV a day, pulmonary embolism deaths increased 70% in people watching between 2.5 to 4.9 hours TV and an extra 40% for each additional two hours of TV watched per day. Deaths increased 2.5 times when people watched TV for five or more hours daily.

Professor Hiroyasu Iso of Osaka University, one of the authors of the report published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, said: ‘Pulmonary embolism occurs at a lower rate in Japan than it does in Western countries, but it may be on the rise. The Japanese people are increasingly adopting sedentary lifestyles, which we believe is putting them at increased risk.’

Toru S, Hiroyasu I et al (2016) Watching Television and Risk of Mortality From Pulmonary Embolism Among Japanese Men and Women. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.023671

40%
Increase in pulmonary embolism deaths for each extra two hours’ TV watched a day in those already seeing nearly five hours of TV

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