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Some types of eyelid cancer rising steadily in England

Certain types of eyelid cancer have risen steadily over the past 15 years in England, with 2% more cases annually and a doubling of risk every decade for the over 60s, researchers say

Certain types of eyelid cancer have risen steadily over the past 15 years in England, researchers say.

A study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology showed an annual increase in cases of 2% and a doubling in risk every decade for people over 60.

Researchers led by Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust looked at data submitted to UK National Cancer Registration and Analysis Services, which record new cases of cancer in the four UK countries.

More likely in men

They studied over 4,000 new cases of squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the eyelid in England between 2000 and 2014.

The figures showed that while people living in areas of deprivation were no more likely to be diagnosed than those in the most affluent areas, men

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Squamous cell cancer on the eyelid of an older patient. Picture: Science Photo Library

Certain types of eyelid cancer have risen steadily over the past 15 years in England, researchers say.

A study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology showed an annual increase in cases of 2% and a doubling in risk every decade for people over 60.

Researchers led by Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust looked at data submitted to UK National Cancer Registration and Analysis Services, which record new cases of cancer in the four UK countries.

More likely in men

They studied over 4,000 new cases of squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the eyelid in England between 2000 and 2014.

The figures showed that while people living in areas of deprivation were no more likely to be diagnosed than those in the most affluent areas, men were almost twice as likely as women to be diagnosed with SCC.


Wawrzynski J et al (2018) Report on the incidence of squamous cell carcinomas affecting the eyelids in England over a 15-year period (2000-2014). British Journal of Ophthalmology. doi:10.1136/bjophthalmol-2017-310956

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