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Risk of dying from cervical cancer higher than previously thought

A new analysis of cervical cancer mortality rates has revealed that the risk of dying from the disease is higher than previously thought, with black women most at risk. 

A new analysis of cervical cancer mortality rates has revealed that the risk of dying from the disease is higher than previously thought, with black women most at risk. 


Cervical cancer mortality rates in the USA are far higher than previously
thought. Picture: Science Photo Library

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health – who re-examined cervical cancer mortality rates from 2002 to 2012 in the United States – said previous estimates also included women who had undergone a hysterectomy and were therefore no longer at risk. 

Their analysis, which only included women with a cervix, found that black women in the United States are dying from cervical cancer at a rate 77% higher than previously thought, and white women are dying at a rate 47% higher. 

Significant underestimation 

The corrected mortality rate in black women was 10.1 per 100,000 women, compared with 5.7 per 100,00 uncorrected, and the corrected rate in white women was 4.7 per 100,000 women compared with 3.2 per 100,000 uncorrected. 

3,200 

women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the UK every year, with more than half of cases diagnosed in women aged 45 or under.

Source: Cancer Research UK 

Without the correction, the disparity in mortality between races was underestimated by 44%. 

‘Although trends over time show the racial disparity in cervical cancer mortality is closing, these data emphasise that it should remain a priority,’ said study author Anne Rositch. 


Beavis A et al (2017) Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States. Cancer. doi:10.1002/cncr.30507

To access RCNi's free cervical cancer resource collection click here 

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