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Pelvic fractures increase risk of dying in older people

Older people have an increased risk of dying in the first eight months after a pelvic fracture, new study results suggest. 

Older people have an increased risk of dying in the first eight months after a pelvic fracture, new study results suggest. 


Researchers found a clear excess mortality in older people in the first
year after pelvic fracture. Picture: Science Photo Library

Researchers in Germany studied 5,685 adults aged 60 and over who had a first pelvic fracture between 2008 and 2010, and 193,159 people without pelvic fracture who acted as controls. 

During the one-year follow-up period, 21% of those with pelvic fracture and 11% of those without pelvic fracture died. 

After adjusting for confounding factors, the researchers found a three times higher risk of death in the first four weeks after fracture. Elevated risk decreased over subsequent weeks but was still significant up to week 32, they said. 

Excess mortality

Excess mortality was also higher for those treated as inpatients, and for men. In the first month after fracture, men had a higher excess mortality for inpatient treated pelvic fractures compared to women. 

'We found a clear excess mortality in older people in the first year after pelvic fracture, even after adjustment for several confounding factors,' the study authors said. 

'Our results underline once more the importance of preventative measures and of further analyses and community-based studies to explore trends of mortality rates,' they added. 


Andrich S et al (2017) Excess mortality after pelvic fractures among older people. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.3116 

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