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New genes help identify testicular cancer risk

A new group of genes that may help identify men most at risk of testicular cancer has been discovered by researchers.
genes

A new group of genes that may help identify men most at risk of testicular cancer has been discovered by researchers

Researchers have discovered a new group of genes they believe can help identify men most at risk of testicular cancer.

The team at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London compared the DNA of more than 7,000 men with testicular cancer with that of 23,000 healthy men.

As well as the 25 genes associated with the cancer that they were already aware of, a total of 19 new ones were identified, many of which affect how chromosomes are kept stable inside the body.

They estimate men with all 44 genes in their cells are 14 times more at risk of developing testicular cancer than those with none.

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A new group of genes that may help identify men most at risk of testicular cancer has been discovered by researchers


Researchers have identified 19 new genes associated with testicular cancer.

Researchers have discovered a new group of genes they believe can help identify men most at risk of testicular cancer.

The team at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London compared the DNA of more than 7,000 men with testicular cancer with that of 23,000 healthy men.

As well as the 25 genes associated with the cancer that they were already aware of, a total of 19 new ones were identified, many of which affect how chromosomes are kept stable inside the body.

They estimate men with all 44 genes in their cells are 14 times more at risk of developing testicular cancer than those with none.

7%

Men with 44 genetic markers have a 7% risk of developing testicular cancer

Writing in the journal Nature Genetics, they recommend that men with a genetically higher risk than most be given biopsies and other tests to check if they would benefit from closer monitoring or preventive treatment.

‘As well as picking out men at highest risk of testicular cancer, our new study also looks at the biology of disease, at what drives cells to become cancerous,’ said Paul Workman from the ICR.

‘This should narrow the search for therapeutic targets and help researchers create new treatments for those men who stop responding to platinum chemotherapy.’


Turnbull C et al (2017) Identification of 19 new risk loci and potential regulatory mechanisms influencing susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumour. Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3896

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