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Magnesium could prevent bone fractures

Magnesium could prevent bone fractures as a leading cause of disability and ill health among middle-aged to older people, research suggests.
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Magnesium could prevent bone fractures as a leading cause of disability and ill-health among middle-aged to older people, research suggests.

The research, led by academics at the universities of Bristol and eastern Finland assessed data for 2,245 middle-aged men from eastern Finland for more than 20 years.

The men, aged 42-61, were part of the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease (KIHD) population-based prospective cohort in eastern Finland.

Scotland and Northern Ireland have the highest rate of fractures in the UK.

Source: University of Southampton study

The study, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, is one of the first to show the benefits of magnesium on bone fractures and assessed serum magnesium measurements and dietary intakes.

Higher concentration, lower

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Magnesium could prevent bone fractures as a leading cause of disability and ill-health among middle-aged to older people, research suggests.


The study is one of the first to show the benefits of magnesium on bone fractures. Picture: iStock

The research, led by academics at the universities of Bristol and eastern Finland assessed data for 2,245 middle-aged men from eastern Finland for more than 20 years.

The men, aged 42-61, were part of the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease (KIHD) population-based prospective cohort in eastern Finland.

Scotland and Northern Ireland have the highest rate of fractures in the UK.

Source: University of Southampton study

The study, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, is one of the first to show the benefits of magnesium on bone fractures and assessed serum magnesium measurements and dietary intakes.

Higher concentration, lower risk

Researchers found that men with lower blood levels of magnesium had an increased risk of fractures, particularly fractures of the hip.

The risk of having a fracture was reduced by 44% in men with higher blood levels of magnesium. None of the 22 men in the study who had very high magnesium levels experienced a fracture during the follow-up period.

University of Eastern Finland principal investigator Jari Laukkanen said although trials were needed, the overall evidence suggests that increasing serum magnesium concentrations may protect against the future risk of fractures.


Kunustor S K et al (2017) Low serum magnesium levels are associated with increased risk of fractures: a long-term prospective cohort study. European Journal of Epidemiology. doi:10.1007/s10654-017-0242-2

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