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Keeping a diary helps people who hear voices

People who hear voices may benefit from recording their experiences in a diary, which is a positive coping strategy, researchers say.

People who hear voices may benefit from recording their experiences in a diary, which is a positive coping strategy, researchers say

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People who hear voices may benefit from keeping a diary to record their experiences, according to researchers.

A small study looked at work-related experiences of people who hear voices, including the impact on their working lives, and self-management strategies.

Researchers from the University of Brighton and Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust recruited five volunteers to keep a diary on their experiences for two to four weeks.

Resilience strategies

Distressing voices that demanded full attention were deemed most disruptive to work, affecting concentration, communication and task completion.

At times voices were experienced as neutral and for some as supportive of work. Meaningful work was found to diminish the negative impact.

Resilience strategies used to manage voices included interacting with them and using activities including work to engage or distract them.

The researchers concluded that keeping a diary was a positive coping strategy and recommended that mental health professionals pay close attention to the diversity of voice-hearing experiences and self-management strategies.


Craig L et al (2017) Work-related experiences of people who hear voices: an occupational perspective. British Journal of Occupational Therapy. doi: 10.1177/0308022617714749

 

 

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