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Eating during the night raises risk of heart disease, diabetes

Eating during the night raises the risk of heart disease and diabetes as it disrupts the body’s 24-hour cycle, researchers say


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Eating during the night raises the risk of heart disease and diabetes as it disrupts the body’s 24-hour cycle, according to researchers.

A team at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, in Mexico City, looked at levels of fat, called triglycerides, in rats’ blood.

They found that after feeding the rats at the beginning of their rest period, their blood fat levels spiked more drastically than when fed at the beginning of their active phase.

Biological clock

When they removed the part of the rat’s brain that controls the 24-hour cycle there was no longer a change in fat levels.

The researchers say heart disease and diabetes are associated with a lifestyle in which humans ignore their biological clocks and eat during the evening and night.

Writing in the journal Experimental Physiology they say regular disruption to the body clock – such as night shifts and jet lag – is harmful to health in the long term.


Moran-Ramos S et al (2017) The suprachiasmatic nucleus drives day-night variations in postprandial triglyceride uptake into skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue. Experimental Physiology. doi: 10.1113/EP086026

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